Wednesday, 04 March 2020

8:30 — 11:00 AM

Registration

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Lobby

Sponsored by:

8:30 — 9:00 AM

Networking Breakfast

Location: 104 Foyer First Floor

Location: 104B, First Floor

Direct Chassis Leasing:
A Case Study in the Benefits for BCOs

9:00 — 10:00 AM

Senior Editor,
West Coast,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Bill Mongelluzzo

Director, Logistics and Compliance,
SG Companies

Panelist

Jeffrey Solomon

Director Sales Northeast,
FlexiVan Leasing Inc.

Panelist

Scott Stogner

Vice President, Logistics,
Fornazor International

Panelist

Carl Varner

Shippers trying to improve flow and reduce costs at major port gateways continue to experience challenges with chassis in terms of shortage of supply, imbalance of equipment, wait times, split chassis fees, different cost structures from different drayage providers, and detention and demurrage costs. The chronic chassis issues led footwear/apparel importer SGCompanies in July 2019 to opt for a different solution: leasing its own chassis in an arrangement with Flexi Van. Grains and animal feed exporter Fornazor also leases chassis. In this session, Jeff Solomon of SGCompanes and Carl Varner of Fornazor will discuss the benefits of leasing chassis versus relying on the chassis pool-of-pools at Los Angeles-Long Beach, the pitfalls of leasing versus the pool-of-pools, and how the determination was made on the correct number of chassis to lease.

A BCO Rationale for Shipment Visibility:
How Eastman Chemical Is Turning Visibility Into Commercial Advantage

Location: 104C, First Floor

The major specialty chemicals company Eastman Chemical set a goal of providing an “Amazon-like experience” to its customers, as part of an overall strategy to deliver excellent products and services and differentiate itself from competitors. Visibility to where products are is a key element of delivering this value, which means supply chain and logistics are playing a critical role in making this vision a reality. After a lengthy vetting process, Eastman selected visibility provider FourKites and IoT device provider ShadowTrack24/7 for a pilot in North America (for truck and ocean) and Europe (for rail). The logistics, IT, and supply chain teams set the initial goals and expectations for the pilot and selected and approached customers. They tested the software and GPS devices initially for truck and then for drayage, and then ocean shipments to Europe and Asia. After several months of testing, the results for Eastman were overwhelmingly positive and it quickly decided to proceed with permanent implementation, with a goal of creating shipment visibility for selected shipments and customers in certain lanes, potentially sharing the status of a shipment with a customer (via Salesforce, for example), as well as being able to receive alerts to manage exception handling for shipments in distress — such as when containers are stuck in a transshipment point. This case study led by Eastman Chemical’s Klaus Schnede and including FourKites and ShadowTrack24/7 will describe the strategy and commercial rationale behind Eastman’s goal of creating greater visibility in its supply chain and how the results have played out.

Eric Johnson

Session Introduction

Senior Editor,
Technology,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Mathew Elinjickal

Panelist

Founder and
Chief Executive Officer,
FourKites

Klaus Schnede

Panelist

Manager,
North American Marine Category, Eastman Chemical

Jeff Stingel

Panelist

President/Owner,
ShadowTrack 24/7

Shipper Case Studies

Location: 104B, First Floor

How Logistics Can Support Exponential Growth:
An Ember Case Study

10:00 — 11:00 AM

Senior Editor,
Technology,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Eric Johnson

Chief Operating Officer,
Asia,
and Senior Vice President,
Ocean Services,
SEKO Worldwide

Panelist

Anthony Barnes

Chief Operating Officer,
Ember Technologies

Panelist

Phil Poel

As Logistics Management recently wrote, “There’s nothing worse than getting halfway into what was once a piping hot cup of coffee or tea, only to have it go cold on you. But what if you could customize that drink’s temperature as you consumed it, vary the degrees to see how it affects the taste, and enjoy your hot beverage right down to the last drop?” That’s the problem Clay Alexander, a holder of 100 patents who invented the GE LED light bulb, set out to solve, a quest that led to the creation of Ember and its first product, a travel mug, being on the shelves at Starbucks in 2016 and sold through Best Buy. By 2018, with Apple as another major customer, the rapidly expanding company was selling mugs in multiple colors as well as accessories and needed a more sophisticated approach to international logistics. That involved changing its initial approach of working through several third-party logistics providers to one where it relies on a primary 3PL, SEKO Logistics, with an integrated system and capabilities across its end-to-end supply chain. As Logistics Management reported, the relationship began with Ember’s connections to SEKO’s Hong Kong team and has since extended across its supply chain. This case study will explore the value of a close 3PL relationship with a focus on utilization of expedited ocean and how that adds value to improve cash flow.

Location: 104C, First Floor

How Shippers Can Take Greater Control Over Airfreight:
A Perry Ellis Case Study

10:00 — 11:00 AM

Greg Knowler

Session Chair

Senior Editor,
Europe,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Daniel Gazitua

Panelist

Senior Vice President,
Customs, Logistics,
and Trade Finance,
Perry Ellis International

Zvi Schreiber

Panelist

CEO,
Freightos

Lacking visibility and agility across ocean freight procurement leaves shippers at the mercy of a highly volatile market, especially during peak demand periods. Although shifting volume to airfreight can mitigate some of this unreliability, shippers are forced to rely on forwarders because they have no direct contact with the airlines. Once a forwarder accepts the cargo, it vanishes into an untraceable black hole until the forwarder notifies the shipper at the other end. But new digital products are providing a viable alternative, offering real-time transparent and dynamic pricing, live booking options, and a vast improvement to ocean freight. In this case study, Daniel Gazitua, senior vice president of customs, logistics, and trade finance at clothing company Perry Ellis International, will present the company’s innovative approach to freight procurement that was devised in collaboration with Freightos Group. For example, while air cargo today is frequently sold as a five-plus-day solution with padded and vague transit times, Perry Ellis can now price, select, and book specific flights in real-time, avoiding the traditional and time-consuming phone or e-mail enquiry process. In this joint presentation, Daniel and Zvi Schreiber, CEO of Freightos, will outline the issues that drove Perry Ellis to change its airfreight strategy, how this was achieved, and the benefits it will bring for the international shipper. 

11:00 — 11:30 AM

Networking Break

Location: 1st Floor

11:30 AM — 12:30 PM

Supply Chain Sustainability:
A BCO Route to Decarbonization

Location: 104C, First Floor

Senior Editor,
Europe,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Greg Knowler

Director,
Transport & Logistics,
BSR

Panelist

Angie Farrag-Thibault

Vice President,
Global Logistics,
Electrolux

Panelist

Bjorn Vang Jensen

Director,
Environment and Sustainability, Maersk Line

Panelist

Lee Kindberg

Vice President,
FCL Product,
DHL Global Forwarding

Panelist

Simon Munn

Vice President,
Global Logistics,
H&M

Panelist

Mats Samuelsson

Beneficial cargo owners are demanding to see accurate and measurable progress from their service providers in reducing carbon dioxide emissions, with more sustainable transportation solutions urgently needed in the drive to decarbonize the supply chain. But success will depend on a commitment from every party involved in the manufacturing and transportation of products made in far-away factories. That commitment to sustainable practices will need to involve shippers, the raw material suppliers of their factories, the factories themselves, forwarders, and carriers. Led by Business for Social Responsibility and its Clean Cargo Working Group, a peer group dedicated to accelerating sustainability in the container shipping industry, this highly relevant and timely case study will see Electrolux and H&M outlining the steps they are taking to decarbonize their global supply chains, and the support being provided by Maersk Line that is allocating enormous resources toward limiting CO2 emissions and finding the zero-carbon fuel of the future.

12:30 — 2:00 PM

Lunch With Speaker

Location: 104C, First Floor

Senior Editor,
West Coast,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Speaker Introduction

Bill Mongelluzzo

CEO,
SeaIntelligence Consulting

Featured Speaker

Lars Jensen

As one of container shipping’s premier analysts and thought leaders, Lars Jensen is world-renown for his analysis of current trends and prescience. His next book, to be released in the run-up to TPM20, will pick up where his 2017(?) book, “Liner Shipping 2025,” left off and look at viable business models over the next decade as the industry prepares for the International Maritime Organization’s push to reduce carbon emissions from shipping by 50 percent by 2050, and Maersk’s even greater commitment to deploy a zero-emission fleet by the same date. The book will answer several pressing questions, including:

     • What are the most viable strategic choices for large and niche global carriers?
     • What markets and advantages remain for niche carriers, and how can the lines defend them?
     • What are the most viable strategic paths in the intersection between carriers and 3PLs, between carriers and terminals, and at the intersection between terminals and BCOs.
     • How is the changing strategic landscape among carriers, terminals, and 3PLs giving rise to new procurement strategies and opportunities for BCOs?

In his third consecutive TPM wrap-up luncheon address, Jensen will take a four-tiered approach to how the industry will get from where it is in 2020 to where it will be in 2050. What will happen in 2020-2021 as a consequence of the targets for 2025-2030? How prepared is the industry to deal with the changes coming in the next two years? What needs to happen in the next five to 10 years to make the 2050 goals reality? And finally, what will the industry look like in 2050, and will the carriers actually agree with and — more important — act upon the IMO’s ambitious goals? Consistently one of TPM’s most engaging speakers, Jensen will offer his usual thought-provoking, and potentially controversial, views in this increasingly popular address.

2:30 — 4:00 PM

Long Beach Port Tour

Location: Dock #9, outside Parker’s Lighthouse, Shoeline Village

REGISTRATION DETAILS FOR THIS EVENT TO COME

The Port of Long Beach cordially invites TPM20 attendees to join a 90-minute harbor cruise that will tour many of the port facilities. The cruise will depart from Dock #9, just outside of Parker’s Lighthouse in Shoreline Village in downtown Long Beach and will last approximately 90 minutes. The tour will offer a close-up look at the many container terminals, on-dock rail yards, and diverse mix of cargo that makes the Port of Long Beach a world leader in goods movement. TPM20 attendees may use this opportunity to discuss with port representatives how the current and future challenges of trade growth are being handled at the Port of Long Beach.

 

 

STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY: All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.