Tuesday, 03 March 2020

7:00 AM — 6:00 PM

Registration

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Lobby

Sponsored by:

7:15 — 8:15 AM

Salute to Diversity in the Workplace

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Beacon Ballroom

Join us for this special TPM breakfast promoting camaraderie, dialogue, and networking that examines the positive impact diversity has in the workplace and can lead to innovation.

Sponsored by:

Senior Editor,
Project and Heavy-Lift Shipping, JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Breakfast Host and
Speaker Introduction

Janet Nodar

Chief Commercial Officer and Chief Strategy Officer,
The Northwest Seaport Alliance

Welcome Remarks

Tong Zhu

President and CEO,
Port of New Orleans,

and CEO,
New Orleans Public Railroad

Featured Speaker

Brandy Christian

7:30 — 8:30 AM

Networking Breakfast

Location: 1st Floor

Sponsored by:

Welcome Remarks and Log-Net eCommerce Excellence Award

8:30 — 8:45 AM

Stuart Strachan

Senior Vice President,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

LOG-NET's Electronic Commerce Excellence award has consistently reinforced the partnership between carriers and their customers and the fundamental importance of data quality in that relationship. Digitization has made data management and data quality foundational elements of successful global supply chains. Whether the data is coming from smartphones, web forms, Internet of Things devices, AI, or EDI, it needs to be complete, timely, and accurate. Data quality is critical, considering the consumers of this information now range from import and logistics specialists to business intelligence and machine learning platforms that demand ever more granular information. For the past 17 years, LOG-NET CEO John Motley has presented the LOG-NET E-Commerce Excellence award. The award recognizes the efforts of the international carrier community and its outstanding daily performance with LOG-NET's Trading Partner and Data Quality teams. 

Sponsored by:

Vice President,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Award Introduction

Peter Tirschwell

CEO,
Log-Net

Award Presenter

John Motley

lognet_fullcolor.jpg

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Lifetime Achievement Award:
Honoring the Port of Oakland’s Chris Lytle

8:45 — 9:00 AM

Vice President,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Award Presenter

Peter Tirschwell

Executive Director,
(Retired) ,
Port of Oakland,
California

Honoree

Chris Lytle

After a 53-year career that included executive positions at shipping lines, terminal operators, and port authorities, Chris Lytle in late 2019 announced his retirement. One of the best known, well-liked, and most quoted executives on the waterfront, Lytle combined his passion for the industry with a genuine interest in the well-being of the individuals with whom he interacted every day. Lytle held leadership positions at Sea-Land Service, A.P. Moller-Maersk, P&O Ports North America, and CMA CGM. He served as executive director of the Port of Long Beach, and since 2013, as executive director of the Port of Oakland, where he is seen as having hugely improved the port during his time there. “I’ve had a long and satisfying career. I’m leaving the industry with great memories and pride in what I’ve accomplished alongside hundreds of wonderful colleagues,” Lytle said upon his retirement from the Port of Oakland. TPM is proud to honor Chris Lytle for an extraordinary logistics industry career.

Mark Szakonyi

Session Chair

Executive Editor,
JOC.com
and The Journal of Commerce, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Jean-Jacques Ruest

Featured Speaker

President and CEO,
Canadian National Railway

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Intermodal Rail Reaches a Critical Juncture:
The Path Forward From Canadian National President and
CEO JJ Ruest

9:00 — 9:45 AM

Investors may be pleased with their quarterly profits, but major North American railroads face an existential crisis as higher-margin carload cargo such as coal declines steadily. With the deterioration worsening because of slowing global economic growth, railroads can batten down the hatches and maintain the status quo, or reinvent their business by injecting themselves deeper into consumer-driven supply chains. JJ Ruest is driving Canadian National Railway down the latter path, even if it means dramatically changing how the company works with marine terminals and trucking companies. That’s seen in CN’s acquisition of logistics provider TransX, which it aims to create a new level of customer service offerings and in the railroad’s willingness to invest in eastern marine terminals to create the “Prince Rupert” of the east coast. In this Day 2 kickoff address, Ruest will outline the challenges facing the international and domestic intermodal sectors and how the nearly 200-year-old industry must transform to survive the new dynamics brought about by a changing cargo mix. His message on the impetus to inject value for shippers into so-called traditional assets will come as railroads and other freight transportation providers face the temptation to focus only on the current slowing volumes, risking lost opportunities.

Sponsored by:

Decarbonization and the Supply Chain:
The Clock Is Ticking

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Peter Tirschwell

Session Chair

Vice President,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Jeremy Nixon

Panelist

Global CEO,
One Network Express

Elisabeth Munck af Rosenschöld

Panelist

Sustainability Manager,
IKEA Transport &
Logistics Services

Dr. Joseph W. Pratt

Panelist

Partner,
Zero Emission Advisors

Otto Schacht

Panelist

Executive Vice President,
Sea Logistics,
Kuehne + Nagel International AG

9:45 — 10:45 AM

Sponsored by:

Confronting the impact of climate change on the container supply chain is rapidly emerging as a top priority of shipping lines, forwarders, and a growing number of BCOs. It involves determining the feasibility of alternative fuels and propulsion technologies and confronting the potential reality of much higher costs. With the International Maritime Organization committing to reduce carbon emissions from shipping by 50 percent by 2050, even more aggressive goals have been set by leading players. Leading that charge is Maersk Line, which committed to having a zero-carbon fleet by 2050, a pledge that spawned the Getting to Zero Coalition initiative of 70-plus companies committed to getting commercially viable deep-sea zero-emission vessels powered by zero-emission fuels into operation by 2030. In this inspirational general session, leading industry figures will discuss the state of play in research, best practices, and possible costs that are almost certainly inevitable as the industry prepares for historic change.

10:45 — 11:15 AM

Networking Break

Location: 1st Floor

Sponsored by:

11:15 AM — 12:00 PM

Collaboration, Technology, and the

Coming Supply Chain Revolution

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

William Cassidy

Session Chair

Senior Editor, Trucking and Domestic Transportation,

JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Shelley Simpson

Featured Speaker

EVP,
Chief Commercial Officer, President,
Highway Services,
J.B. Hunt Transport Services 

12:00 — 12:45 PM

View From the Top:
A Conversation With Industry Leaders

Host of Let’s Talk Supply Chain and CEO of Shipz

Session Chair

Sarah Barnes-Humphrey

Manager,
Carrier Relations and International,
Supply Chain,
Ecolab

Panelist

Catherine Arredia

President,
CMA CGM America

 

Panelist

Ludovic Renou

Member of the Management Board of Deutsche Post DHL Group, CEO DHL Global Forwarding,
Freight

Panelist

Tim Scharwath

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

What is the perspective and outlook of industry leaders as we reach the quarter pole of 2020 in a year that could prove to be pivotal for international logistics? As we look forward into 2020 and beyond, how do industry leaders see their segments of the industry evolving? Where do they see risks in the international supply chain? Will technology finally be transformational or will it remain incremental in its impact? What impact has the IMO 2020 low-sulfur fuel mandate had through the first two months since implementation? Consolidation among container carriers has led to increasingly divergent strategies among the few remaining incumbents and is creating new pressures between carriers and forwarders. In this industry leaders’ session, we will have a lively discussion with a group of industry leaders about how they see the future unfolding this year and beyond.

Sponsored by:

12:45 — 1:45 PM

Networking Lunch

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Regency & Beacon Ballrooms

1:45 — 2:45 PM

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

Marine Terminal Automation

and the Next Big Battleground:

An Early Look at 2022 Labor Negotiations

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

The 2019 dispute over a reefer automation project at APM Terminals at the Port of Los Angeles was a wakeup call for how volatile the issue of automation is at West Coast ports. It already has insiders worried about 2022 when the West Coast collective bargaining agreement will next come up for renewal and could flare again at any moment if and when other terminals choose to pursue automation projects as is their right under the existing longshore labor contract. For importers and exporters, one of the key lessons from the 2002 and 2014 contract negotiations — when labor disruptions and retaliation by employers led to gridlock at West Coast ports — was the need to establish business relationships with truckers and warehouse operators on the East and Gulf coasts long before the West Coast contract expires to ensure supply chain capacity in case they must divert their freight to other gateways. One thing the ILWU and the Pacific Maritime Association can agree on is that West Coast ports must improve cargo-handling efficiency and reduce operating costs in order to stem a further loss of market share to competing ports in the US, and to Vancouver and Prince Rupert in Canada — making automation the linchpin for both sides. The West Coast share of US imports from Asia has declined from 71.2 percent in 2014 to 61.9 percent last year, according to PIERS (a sister product of The Journal of Commerce within IHS Markit). Representatives of the National Retail Federation and the Pacific Merchant Shipping Association will give their views on what labor and management on the West Coast must do to be the ports of choice in the US-Asia trade.

Bill Mongelluzzo

Session Chair

Senior Editor, West Coast,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Jonathan Gold

Panelist

Vice President,

Supply Chain
and
Customs Policy
National Retail Federation

John McLaurin

Panelist

President,

Pacific Merchant Shipping Association

Sponsored by:

IMO 2020:
Where We Stand and What the Transition Looks Like

Location: Room 102, 1st Floor

From an operational standpoint, the Jan. 1 start date of the International Maritime Organization’s low-sulfur mandate went without a hitch. Now comes the hard part for carriers: getting a handle on fuel price volatility expected to last at least another three months while determining whether to order more scrubber installations, based on where they see high-sulfur fuel supply and pricing heading. For beneficial cargo owners, price discovery on the low-sulfur fuels may offer a better idea of how to budget for next year, but the variety of pass-through costs by carriers and trade lanes add a dimension to analyze amid trans-Pacific service contracting. In this highly anticipated actionable session, industry experts will detail the medium-term outlook for pricing and supply of low and high-sulfur fuels; how scrubbers are reshaping the operating cost landscape; BCO strategies for freight invoicing; and just how effective enforcement is in keeping the playing field fair. 

Associate Managing Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Kevin Saville

Consulting Director, Oil Markets, Midstream & Downstream,
IHS Markit

Panelist

Hédi Grati

Director,
Global Logistics,
Crocs

Panelist

Mary McNelly

Senior Partner,
20/20 Marine Energy

Panelist

Adrian Tolson

Cool Cargoes III:

What Do Shippers Really Want — and at What Price?

Location: Room 104B, First Floor

The global refrigerated perishables business has seen growth and expansion, in no small part because of the rise of the middle class and the reach of global carriers. Despite this expansion, freight rates have fallen over the years, rendering some of the largest commodity types, including proteins and bananas, to be marginally profitable for the carriers. Carriers have reacted by reducing services, limiting investment in container, gen-sets and other equipment; and reducing terms on contracts for free time and detention and demurrage. In today’s environment, are BCOs’ expectations being met when compared to the price they pay for moving the cargo? What do the refrigerated BCOs truly want and how willing are they to pay for reinvestment back into this perishable commodity group for future growth?

Sponsored by:

North American
Cold Chain Adviser,
Eskesen Advisory

Session Chair

William C. Duggan

Senior Vice President,
Logistics and Procurement,
Trident Seafoods

Panelist

Ronald Hildebrandt

Vice President,
Trade Policy and
Technical Services,
US Poultry & Egg Export Council

Panelist

Jean Murphy

Vice President,
Supply Chain and Sustainability,
Produce Marketing Association

Panelist

Ed Tracey

3:15 — 4:15 PM

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

Shipper Strategies:
Managing Container Flow Through
Marine Terminals and Rail Ramps in 2020

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

The collection and sharing of data on terminal congestion, gate times, and cargo availability increasingly is seen as the way forward for improving cargo fluidity at marine terminals and intermodal rail ramps. At most ports and rail facilities, however, the collection of data lacks standards, causing truckers to question the accuracy of the data. The Harbor Trucking Association since 2013 has tabulated monthly truck visit times at the 12 container terminals in Los Angeles-Long Beach, and more recently at Oakland. The HTA publishes key performance metrics including average turn times on a terminal-by-terminal and a portwide basis, as well as the percentage of truck visit times each month that exceed two hours. The HTA meets regularly with individual terminal operators, and the two parties agree on how each can improve performance for the good of the entire supply chain. The efforts are producing quantifiable results, with recorded turn-times in September the best in six years. Kuehne + Nagel, with offices throughout North America, each week collects turn-time data at some 65 marine terminals and rail ramps. In addition to detecting trends, the data allows the service provider to advise its customers on where the bottlenecks are and how to work around those obstacles. This panel will discuss trends and provide real-world advice on how marine terminal and rail ramp operators can work with their customers to improve cargo velocity.

Sponsored by:

Senior Editor, West Coast,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Bill Mongelluzzo

Chief Executive Officer,
Harbor Trucking Association;

and President & CEO,
Ventures 52

Panelist

Weston LaBar

Vice President,
Strategic Development,
Kuehne + Nagel

Panelist

Bill Rooney

Director,
North America Logistics,
Global Container Logistics Group, Louis Dreyfus

Panelist

Michael Symonanis

CEO,
Taylor Logistics

Panelist

Michelle Taylor

Shipper Strategies:
Developing an Effective Air Cargo Plan

Location: Room 102, 1st Floor

Managers of ocean BCO supply chains have traditionally held a special dislike for air cargo, regarding that transportation option as nothing more than a costly last resort that’s guaranteed to get the CFO yelling down the line. But this is an unfair and outdated assessment of the air freight market, where new digital platforms using IoT and big data are improving visibility and allowing more strategic management of shipments. Despite the higher transportation cost, there are savings to be found in BCO supply chains by adjusting the air and ocean mix and moving away from the air-cargo-as-an-emergency approach. This panel of BCOs and logistics experts will discuss how to incorporate air cargo into your supply chain in a structured manner without breaking the bank.

Sponsored by:

Greg Knowler

Session Chair

Senior Editor,
Europe,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Alan Chester

Panelist

Senior Vice President, International Operations
and Transportation,
Williams Sonoma

Tim Strauss

Panelist

Vice President,
Air Canada Cargo

Christian Sur

Panelist

Executive Vice President,
Unique Logistics International

Stan Wraight

Panelist

President and CEO,
Strategic Aviation Solutions International 

Cool Cargoes IV:

Population Growth, Climate Change, 
and the Long-Term Threat

Location: Room 104B, First Floor

Rapidly growing population that has seen the world’s inhabitants soar from 6.13 billion in the year 2000 to an expected 7.49 billion this year, coupled with increasing incidents of drought, devastating storms, and rising temperatures is leading to unprecedented change in living conditions. How the near-, medium-, and long-term future plays out will have significant consequences on the world’s food supply and the supply chain interests that produce and transport it. This concluding Cool Cargoes session will take the long view of these critical issues, debate the conflicting mega-trends, and identify opportunities and threats to cold-chain interests. Among the questions it will address:

• Is there enough food to feed the growing world population?

• Will climate change eventually destroy the agricultural business?

• Will alternative proteins and growing consumer awareness replace traditional meat consumption?

• Will we finally be able to resolve food waste through better packaging, shelf life innovation, packaging, and intelligent containers/IOT devices?

• How will these conflicting mega-trends potentially impact the transportation business?

Thomas Eskesen

Session Chair

Founder,
Eskesen Advisory

Ryland Martsbarger

Panelist

Associate Director,
Agriculture,
Economics and Country Risk,
IHS Markit

Jessica Poliner

Panelist

Vice President and General Manager, Global Marine,

Rail and Air (MRA),

Thermo King

Raja Ramachandran

Panelist

Co-Founder and CEO,

Ripe.io

4:15 — 5:15 PM

Where Do We Go From Here?
Spinning Forward the Key Takeaways From TPM20

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Having heard from multiple experts at TPM, what does the picture look like as we head deeper into 2020, and how should BCOs approach this climate? Given the dynamics of the 2020 market, what should be the key strategies around service contracting going into direct carrier negotiations ahead of what for many remains a May 1 renewal date on annual contracts? How should BCOs approach the fuel issue with IMO2020 now a reality? What tweaks to carrier mix and number of carrier contracts should BCOs be considering given the fewer number of carriers remaining in the market? How best to manage the greater frequency of blanked sailings and continued likelihood of far-from-perfect schedule reliability? How should BCOs be looking at the mix of direct contracts versus NVOs? These topics and others will be addressed in this forward-looking session that will spin forward key takeaways from TPM20.

Peter Tirschwell

Session Chair

Vice President,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Philip Damas

Panelist

Managing Director,
Drewry,
and Operational Head,
Drewry Supply Chain Advisors

Andrew Gillespie

Panelist

Director, Global Logistics,

Ansell

Matthew Leech

Panelist

CEO, Americas,

DP World

Thorsten Meincke

Panelist

Member of the
Board Air/Ocean Freight,
DB Schenker AG

5:15 — 7:15 PM

Networking Reception

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Pool Deck

Sponsored by:

 

 

STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY: All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.