Monday, 02 March 2020

7:00 AM — 6:00 PM

Registration

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Lobby

7:30 — 8:30 AM

Networking Breakfast

Location: 1st Floor

Sponsored by:

Welcome Remarks

8:30 — 9:00 AM

Vice President,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Peter Tirschwell

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

9:00 — 9:45 AM

Keynote Address

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Chairman and CEO,
IHS Markit

Introduction

Lance Uggla

Director, National Economic Council (2017-2018)
and President and COO,
Goldman Sachs (2006-2016)

Keynote Speaker

Gary Cohn

As the former director of the National Economic Council under President Donald Trump and a former president of Goldman Sachs, Gary Cohn is an ardent free trader who has a unique perspective of trade policy that will resonate with TPM attendees up and down the supply chain, from major shippers of containerized cargo to service providers, who have been severely impacted by the US-China trade dispute since the first tariffs were imposed in mid-2018. Cohn served as assistant to the president for economic policy and director of the National Economic Council from January 2017 through April 2018. As President Trump’s chief economic adviser, he managed the administration’s economic policy agenda and led the successful effort to grow the US economy through historic tax and regulatory reform. Prior to his White House service, Cohn was president and chief operating officer of Goldman Sachs, where he worked for more than 25 years. “There is not a single BCO, carrier, forwarder, or other participant in container trade that was not in one way or another affected by the US-China trade dispute and broader trade policies of the Trump administration. Gary Cohn is a passionate free trader, having cautioned against the use of tariffs in trade policy while serving in the White House and since leaving office,” said Peter Tirschwell, vice president, maritime & trade, IHS Markit, and chair of TPM. In this can't-miss address, Cohn will offer his insights of trade policy and his role in it, before sitting down for a one-on-one discussion with IHS Markit chairman and CEO Lance Uggla.

Vice President,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Introduction

Peter Tirschwell

Chief Economist,
IHS Markit

Featured Speaker

Dr. Nariman Behravesh

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

The Global Economic and Trade Outlook:
A Presentation by IHS Markit Chief Economist Dr. Nariman Behravesh

9:45 — 10:15 AM

As the fourth quarter of 2019 hit the midway point, one dominant issue was determining the direction of the global economy and its medium-term outlook: global trade uncertainty. As November started, the US and China were making initial progress on a deal that could pave the way to ending a tariff war well into its second year, but the timing and scope of any agreement are still very much up in the air. In an October note, IHS Markit Chief Economist Nariman Behravesh cited the sharp rise and increasing volatility over the past year in indices derived from news and earnings reports that measure Trade Policy Uncertainty. The result of this uncertainty is a reduction in US capital spending and real GDP of $100 billion (or 0.5 percent), with manufacturing suffering the biggest hit. Meanwhile, commodity markets are under growing pressure from the trade war, little to no growth in manufacturing, and geopolitical tension in the Middle East; and the global Purchasing Managers’ Index hit a three-year low in September, another sign of manufacturing weakness. The ramifications for all this for world GDP are clear in the latest projections from IHS Markit (parent company of the JOC), which show a drop from 3.4 percent in 2017, the year before the US-China trade war started, to 2.5 percent in 2020. As Behravesh said in the October note: “Recent market trends have confirmed what was surmised before: There is no upside to a trade war, and the damage is especially painful when global growth is on a downward trend.” Consistently one of the most popular speakers at TPM, Behravesh will return to deliver his typical clear, concise, informed, and forward-looking analysis of the US and global economies and how they connect to containerized trade in 2020 and beyond.

Sponsored by:

10:15 — 10:45 AM

Networking Break

Location: 1st Floor

10:45 — 11:45 AM

Container Shipping Outlook:
Are the Scales Tipping Against BCOs?

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Mark Szakonyi

Session Chair

Executive Editor,
JOC.com and
The Journal of Commerce,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Carolina B. Dores

Panelist

Equity Analyst,
EMEA Transport,
Morgan Stanley

Rahul Kapoor

Panelist

Vice President and Head of Research and Analytics,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Graham Slack

Panelist

Chief Economist and
Head of Strategic Intelligence,
A.P. Moller-Maersk

Sponsored by:

The fundamentals of container shipping may be improving, but the industry is hardly out of the woods, as the outlook for demand weakens and carriers grapple with higher operating costs tied to the low-sulfur global mandate. Maritime research firm Alphaliner expects global container capacity in 2020 to expand 3.3 percent while demand will grow 3.1 percent, compared with 2019 increases of 3.6 percent and 2.4 percent, respectively. But demand is fluid, particularly as the US-China trade war takes steady US economic growth down a notch, prompting Drewry Shipping Consultants in early October to downgrade its demand outlook for 2019 to 2.6 percent from 3 percent. And, although carriers have met the International Maritime Organization's low-sulfur fuel mandate, their effort to pass on higher operating costs to shippers and forwarders or risk a return to deep losses is ongoing and hardly certain. This session will decipher what all this means for profitability and how carriers manage capacity globally and on the trans-Pacific and trans-Atlantic. The panel of industry experts also will address carriers’ rising debt levels, driven largely through acquisitions Maersk, CMA CGM, and others have taken to revamp, and even revolutionize, their offerings.

11:45 — 12:30 PM

Improving Carrier-Terminal Cooperation

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Peter Tirschwell

Speaker Introduction

Vice President,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Rolf Habben Jansen

Featured Speaker

CEO,
Hapag-Lloyd

Sponsored by:

There are tangible efficiency gains to be achieved between carriers and terminals if we collaborate more and closer. Hapag-Lloyd CEO Rolf Habben Jansen will present some ideas on how the industry can take another significant step forward.

12:30 — 1:00 PM

Three Ways to Win the Next Wave of Globalization

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Senior Editor, Technology,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Speaker Introduction

Eric Johnson

Senior Vice President, IBM Global Industries, Clients, Platforms & Blockchain,
IBM

Featured Speaker

Bridget Van Kralingen

The container shipping industry has been at the forefront of two highly impactful macro-dynamics: a slowing of growth in international trade, and heightened investment in technology that empowers global commerce. In that light, organizations managing global supply chains have a complicated task, namely figuring out how to integrate cutting-edge technology without veering off course. That all has to happen while satisfying end customers — consumers and B2B — who are becoming more exacting and demanding each day. Globalization isn’t dead, but its next iteration does require a different approach than what was successful in the past, which largely was driven by advantages of labor arbitrage and inexpensive ocean transport. The next wave of globalization will require a deeper focus on the customer, and in smartly investing in technology and people that can deepen that focus. Bridget van Kralingen, senior vice president at IBM, will give TPM attendees a welcome roadmap for this evolution. Van Kralingen has led a distinguished, multi-decade career helping various markets to understand technology development and adoption, and is a global thought leader on digital transformation. She currently leads a variety of key initiatives at IBM, including those around blockchain, and more broadly governing strategy, research, solution developments and talent discovery across global industries. IBM, through its TradeLens platform (jointly developed and sold with Maersk) and its artificial intelligence systems, has been making a lot of noise in the global supply chain space.

1:00 — 2:15 PM

Networking Lunch

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Regency & Beacon Ballrooms

Sponsored by:

2:15 — 3:15 PM

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

Shipper Strategies:
Managing Detention and Demurrage

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

After more than three years of investigation, the Federal Maritime Commission has established a framework to resolve long-running detention and demurrage disputes between ocean carriers and BCOs. If nothing else, awareness about the issue — cargo owners complain that they shouldn’t be held responsible when weather or other factors prevent timely pickup of cargo and return of equipment, while carriers and marine terminals counter that they can’t eat higher operating costs, either — has increased, and all stakeholders understand how important it is to find common ground and solve the problem together. BCOs now also have more confidence to file claims with the FMC, if necessary, because the agency has provided a framework to adjudicate the reasonableness of these penalties. This session will analyze what steps BCOs, truckers, terminal operators, and ocean carriers can take to implement long-lasting solutions in a cooperative fashion.

Sponsored by:

Partner and Co-Chair, International Trade and
Logistics Group,
Venable LLP

Session Introduction

Ashley Craig

Logistics Manager,
Wolverine WorldWide (WWW)

Speaker Introduction

Rachael Acker

Associate Editor,
Southeast Ports
and Intermodal Rail,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Ari Ashe

Vice President,
Logistics and Carrier Management,
BassTech International

Panelist

Lori Fellmer

Vice President,
CMI West,
CMI Transportation

Panelist

Robert Loya

President and CEO,
Yusen Terminals LLC

Panelist

Alan McCorkle

Vice President,
International Transportation, Mohawk Global

Panelist

Rich Roche

Will Technology Transform Spot Ocean Pricing
and the Market Overall?

Location: 102, First Floor

The last 18 months has produced an unprecedented number of options for shippers to shop for ocean freight rates online. Numerous container lines as well as a significant proportion of the world’s biggest forwarders now offer shippers the ability to get instant quotes and book capacity electronically. Notably, one of those options (Maersk, through its Maersk Spot product) also offers buyers a guarantee that cargo will be loaded as booked if the booking happens electronically. If the container line fails to load as booked, it will pay a compensation fee to the buyer. On the other hand, if a buyer books through Maersk Spot and does not show, it has to pay Maersk a fee. This is not a new concept — overbooking and no-show penalties have been tried before, with little success. But taken in tandem with NYSHEX, a neutral platform designed to enable guaranteed forward bookings between carriers and freight buyers, it’s worth exploring whether the industry is now ready to embrace such an approach. And more broadly, whether electronic quoting and associated booking (guaranteed or not) will become more prevalent in ocean freight. One school of thought is that spot quoting will eventually migrate to an electronic environment, while contracts will remain as they are today. Another thought is that acceptance of dynamic quotes will grow and eventually compel shippers to adjust their mix of contract and spot buying. An expert panel will discuss current acceptance of electronic quoting, the impact of penalty-related guaranteed bookings, and how this will all play out in the years to come.

Sponsored by:

CEO and Partner,
SeaIntelligence Consulting

Session Chair and Presenter

Lars Jensen

Chief Executive Officer
and President,
Ocean Wide Logistics (OL-USA)

Panelist

Alan Baer

Vice President,
Sales and Marketing,
New York Shipping Exchange (NYSHEX)

Panelist

Kimberly Cockrell

Regional Sales Director,
Catapault - An Accelya Group Company

Panelist

Laura Finbow

Director
Global Logistics,
Solvay Technology Solutions

Panelist

Siva Narayanan

Senior Vice President,
Sales and Customer Service, Hapag-Lloyd

Panelist

Hardy Pearson

Vice President and Head of Research and Analytics,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair and Presenter

Rahul Kapoor

CEO,
Arviem AG

Panelist

Stefan Reidy

The Coming Convergence
of Trade Finance and Logistics

Location: 104B, 1st Floor

It’s often a long walk between the finance department and the logistics department, a gap that’s as cultural and metaphorical as much as physical for most beneficial cargo owners. As a result, the idea of using information about the movement of goods as a lever to extract finance value has rarely been considered historically. But that’s changing, as new tools emerge that tie freight data directly to the financing of goods like never before. This is not about a carrier or 3PL offering credit terms for its own services, but about the financing of actual goods. Part of this is a change in technology, with in-transit visibility improving to the extent that financing entities can reduce their perceived risk in providing funding to shippers. But a large part of the change is cultural, as BCOs begin to see logistics functions as a value driver rather than a cost center. That idea has been en vogue for a while, but there have been precious few specific examples of logistics activities enhancing a company’s bottom line, outside reduced freight spend, lower inventory levels, and fewer stockouts. But, according to advocates of these products, tethering logistics data to trade finance opportunities can help shippers reduce financing costs, preserve working capital, or get access to financing they might not ordinarily have. This session will explore the role of new product offerings in furthering those goals, both from a technological and cultural perspective. A spectrum of providers of such offerings will discuss how and why they do so, while a shipper will discuss the benefits of using such tools.

3:15 — 3:45 PM

Networking Coffee Break

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Sponsored by:

3:45 — 4:30 PM

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

TPM Accelerator:
The NotPetya Attack on Maersk, FedEx and Others —
A Look Back and the Future Impact

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Andy Greenberg

Featured Speaker

Senior Writer,
Wired,
and Author of the Book, Sandworm: A New Era of Cyberwar and

the Hunt for the Kremlin's

Most Dangerous Hackers

Trucking 2020:
Is the Market About to Turn Against Shippers Again?

Location: Room 102, 1st Floor

For the past year, beneficial cargo owners and domestic shippers have enjoyed strong pricing leverage in US trucking markets, especially the spot truckload market, as transactional pricing dropped from highs reached in 2018, pulling contract truckload rates down with them. 2019’s low rates and a capacity cornucopia marked an abrupt about-face from 2018, when truck supply tightened and prices soared by double digits. There are signals, including the Coyote Curve forecast from Coyote Logistics and a slow increase in spot rates that began last summer, that the truckload pricing cycle may turn again this year, with Coyote saying spot rates could rise again year over year in the first half of 2020. That could affect pricing from dry-van truckload to container drayage to LTL trucking, and fuel a rise in contract rates in the second half. What are the risks to shippers moving goods inland from ports by truck in 2020 and beyond, and how can they best prepare for them? Are they shifting freight among various modes to achieve a better supply chain balance and control costs? How might economic changes, and the outcome of US trade battles, change the picture? This panel will examine these questions and more as we attempt to hone the 2020 vision for North American trucking.

Sponsored by:

Senior Editor,
Trucking and Domestic Transportation,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

William Cassidy

Managing Director,
Research Analyst,
Transportation, Stephens Inc.

Panelist

Jack Atkins

Supply Base Manager,
Global Logistics,
Deere & Company

Panelist

Jennifer Boukal

Logistics Director,

SanMar

Panelist

John Janson

Senior Analyst,
Transportation & Logistics, Bloomberg Intelligence

Panelist

Lee Klaskow

CEO,
Tucker Company Worldwide

Panelist

Jeff Tucker

Cool Cargoes I:
2020 Opportunities and Challenges

Location: Room 104B, First Floor

A combination of new and familiar risks is confronting the refrigerated shipping sector as the turbulence of 2018 shows no signs of letting up. On the political front, US and foreign agricultural shippers have been among the hardest hit in the US-China trade war that is now in its second year. The looming impact of the International Maritime Organization's low-sulfur rule and its ramifications could slash carrier investment in equipment, including reefer containers — where capacity already is struggling to keep up with demand. Still, growth in US imports and exports of perishable food is a bright spot, as is technology that helps support the reefer sector with smarter, more sophisticated containers while giving shippers and other cargo stakeholders better analytics to optimize their operations and improve customer service. This session will analyze the state of the reefer shipping sector, the outlook for 2020, how geopolitical and regulatory uncertainty is impacting sourcing and routing decisions, and advancements in efficiency-enhancing technology.

Sponsored by:

Director of Solution Strategy,
Infor Nexus

Session Introduction

Monica Truelsch

Founder,
Eskesen Advisory

Session Chair

Thomas Eskesen

Vice President,
Refrigerated Cargo Sales,
CMA CGM America LLC

Panelist

Richard Conser

Founder and CEO,

Emergent Cold

Panelist

Neal Rider

Director, Global Transportation and Logistics Services, AJC International

Panelist

Chris Swartz

4:30 — 5:30 PM

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

AB5:
Where Do California Drayage Operators Go From Here?

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

It’s a whole new relationship and playing field between trucking companies and port truckers in California. Assembly Bill 5 officially becomes law in January, codifying a so-called ABC test to determine whether a worker is an employee or independent contractor. Legal experts say trucking companies fail the “B” prong: “The worker performs work that is outside the usual course of the hiring entity’s business.” Judges applying the test have ruled that port trucker drivers are employees. In response, trucking companies Have three options: 

• Make drivers employees.
• Become a freight property broker.
• Do nothing and hope a legal challenge will result in an exemption for trucking because interstate commerce is regulated by Congress, not states. 

This session will explore the latest legal updates, what trucking companies and BCOs should do, and how drayage rates have been impacted by the law in the first two months of 2020.

Ari Ashe

Session Chair

Associate Editor,
Southeast Ports and
Intermodal Rail,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Mark Bartmann

Panelist

Senior Director,
Seafreight Drayage Solutions, North America,
Kuehne + Nagel

Alex Cherin

Panelist

Partner,
and Executive Director,
Englander Knabe & Allen,
and Executive Director,
Intermodal Conference,
California Trucking Association 

Jaime Laurent

Panelist

Shareholder and Labor
and Employment Attorney,
Littler

Greg Sanders

Panelist

CEO,
Rail Delivery Services

Karen Vellutini

Panelist

Executive Vice President,
Devine Intermodal

Shipper Strategies:
Mitigating Tariffs in the Protectionist Era

Location: Room 102, 1st Floor

The Trump administration the past two years has launched trade sanctions or tariffs involving China, the European Union, and its closest trading partners in Canada and Mexico. US importers are learning that if they remain nimble, and adhere to strict guidelines enforced by regulatory agencies, they can continue to thrive in this uncertain environment. However, a company that changes its overseas sourcing and adjusts its supply chain to other regions of the world can be a costly, complex and possibly risky venture that only should be taken with the advice and oversight of professional logisticians and customs attorneys. Changing product sourcing from China to Vietnam to avoid tariffs may sound like an easy solution, but the importer must do due diligence to ensure Vietnam has the factories, skilled labor, and transportation infrastructure needed to consistently provide quality products in the quantity it needs. Transshipping products made in China through another country in order to be able to tell US Customs & Border Patrol that enough transformation of the product took place in the second country to be able to prove it was manufactured there requires guidance from a customs attorney. Locating a plant in one of about 200 foreign trade zones in the US has been a tariff-mitigation option for many companies for years, and may work for your firm today, with the proper legal guidance on customs issues. Importing your shipments into a bonded warehouse allows you to delay paying tariffs until the products are released into US commerce, but again, the advice of a customs attorney may be needed to maintain your status as a trusted importer. This panel will ask BCOs, a freight forwarder, and customs attorney how importers can safely navigate through these turbulent waters.

Senior Editor,
West Coast,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Bill Mongelluzzo

Global Trade Compliance Director,
Supply Chain,
JCPenney

Panelist

Sandra Fallgatter

Director,
Global Supply Chain,
Procon Pacific

Panelist

Daniel Krassenstein

Chief Economist,
Footwear Distributors and Retailers of America

 

Panelist

Gary Raines

Partner,
Mitchell Silderberg & Knupp

Panelist

Susan Kohn Ross

Head of
Trade Compliance Services,
Vandegrift,
a Maersk Company

Panelist

Jane Taeger

Cool Cargoes II:
Funding Growth — Are We Facing
a Critical Equipment Shortage?

Location: Room 104B, First Floor

The global refrigerated perishable market continues to grow and outpace overall trade growth, sparking a wave of merger and acquisition activity in the cold-storage sector and dramatically changing the landscape. Following in the footsteps of ocean carriers, terminals are investing at or around port facilities. Domestic over-the-road reefer trucking and rail is growing. Demand for refrigerated equipment investment is rocketing. And it won’t be long before smart technology, while an added value today, is a flat-out necessity. With billions of dollars of private equity investment flowing into the cold chain, who are the players that will lead and grow on land, at sea, in IT, in owning assets, and in domestic transportation. In today’s turbulent times, will the funding be there to meet future needs? This session will explore the state of cold-chain investment and whether it will keep up with soaring demand.

Sponsored by:

North American Cold Chain Adviser,
Eskesen Advisory

Session Introduction

William C. Duggan

CEO and Port Director,
Port of Hueneme

Panelist

Kristin Decas

Global Head
of Cold Chain Logistics,
A.P. Moller-Maersk

Panelist

Katharina Poehlmann

CEO,
SeaCube Containers

Panelist

Robert Sappio

5:30 — 7:30 PM

Welcome Reception

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Beacon Ballroom

Sponsored by:

 

 

STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY: All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.