Wednesday, 06 March 2019

8:00 — 11:00 AM

Registration

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Lobby

Sponsored by:

8:30 — 9:00 AM

Networking Breakfast

Location: 104 Foyer

Shipper Case Studies

Location: Room 104B, First Floor

Successfully Outsourcing Origin Logistics:
A Talbots Case Study

9:00 — 10:00 AM

Peter Tirschwell

Panelist

Executive Director,
Content,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Ronald Marotta

Panelist

Vice President,
Origin Cargo Movement,
International,
Yusen Logistics (Americas)

Lema May

Panelist

Senior Manager,
Global Logistics and Compliance,
Talbots

Going to bid for outsourced logistics services, even in the best of all worlds, is a time-consuming and risky process. Logistics partners aren’t like other vendors, because they're often deeply embedded in the organization and critical in supporting revenue and cost objectives. Talbots faced these challenges when going to bid for an origin cargo management vendor. The women's apparel and fashion retailer needed to be confident it could tangibly measure results, experience a personal touch, leverage cutting-edge technology and make it available to the broader Talbots organization, and importantly, be challenged by its vendor to show constant improvement. This would enable the company to maximize performance in critical areas for a fashion retailer, such as speed to market. In this case study, Lema May, Talbots' senior manager of global logistics and compliance, will describe the end-to-end journey of approaching and executing the challenge of finding the right 3PL origin partner, and what the successful results have been with Yusen Logistics.

9:00 — 10:00 AM

Connecting Road, Rail, and Sea:
A Case Study in Supply Chain Optimization Through Multimodal Visibility

Location: Room 104C, First Floor

End-to-end supply-chain visibility has long been dubbed “the Holy Grail” of logistics, but it’s rarely if ever been achievable. Too often shipments disappear into “black holes” as they move from factories to ports, from ships to drayage chassis to warehouses, and from there to trucks and railcars and to distribution centers. In an age of multimodal transportation and rapid fulfillment cycles, those black holes are no longer acceptable. Fortunately, technology is finally unlocking the true potential of end-to-end visibility, with solutions touching every mode and geography of global supply chains. By connecting truckload, less-than-truckload, parcel and final-mile with rail and ocean, shippers can gain accurate, timely insights into shipment status and proactively address exceptions and events. In this case study, Tommy Barnes, president of project44, David Casey, senior director of port solutions for GE Transportation, and Tony Heldreth, vice president, supply chain at Owens Corning discuss the vast benefits of multimodal, end-to-end visibility and how it can be achieved.

William Cassidy

Session Chair

Senior Editor, Trucking,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

C. Thomas Barnes

Panelist

President,
project44

David Casey

Panelist

Senior Director,
Port Solutions,
General Electric Transportation

Tony Heldreth

Panelist

Vice President,
Supply Chain,
Owens Corning

Location: Room 104B, First Floor

Reimagining an Import Logistics Program:
A 1A Auto Case Study

10:00 — 11:00 AM

Executive Director Content,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Peter Tirschwell

Co-Founder and President,
BOC International

Panelist

Patrick Fay

Head of Logistics,
1A Auto

Panelist

Richard Higgins

Director,
Corporate Sales,
CST

Panelist

Mike Prandato

How do you take an international logistics program that was an afterthought at a rapidly growing company and, within a short time, transform it into a best-in-class operation creating strategic value for the overall enterprise? 1A Auto, which sells auto parts directly to consumers online, is one example of how this was done. It involved identifying and fixing pricing anomalies in its ocean and small parcel contracts, negotiating directly with ocean carriers, implementing a more collaborative forwarder and OEM provider, introducing origin consolidation in China, considering East and West Coast trans-Pacific routings for its distribution centers and becoming more disciplined, utilizing more operationally efficient drayage carriers. This has resulted in 1A becoming a “shipper of choice,” more expeditiously turning equipment, avoiding detention, demurrage, and storage trailer fees. It also involved a rethinking of overall strategy that resulted in better balancing volumes between two distribution facilities, in Kansas City and Massachusetts, significantly reducing inter-facility truckload transfers and directly supporting the company’s ability to scale. 1A's journey is a case study of how an informed approach to innovation in logistics, together with effective execution, can directly support a company’s ability to grow.

10:00 — 11:00 AM

Providing Supply Chain Visibility to Your Sales Team:
A Sentury Tire Case Study

Location: Room 104C, First Floor

Your logistics team may know what’s going on with your shipments, but what about the rest of the company? The sales team at Sentury Tire needed better information about when shipments would arrive so they could let their customers know when to expect delivery. Without access to updated shipment information in a usable format, their only option was to ask the logistics team for updates, an inefficient process that resulted in unnecessary manual work. Because the sales team needed the information in the context of its customers and their orders, Sentury Tire implemented an integration with Salesforce to combine the tracking and status information about their shipments with their customer and sales information. This gave sales team direct access to real-time updates about the status of their shipments for their customers and freed the logistics team to focus on managing logistics and distribution. Juan Tatis, Sentury Tire’s director of logistics and supply chain, will discuss the company’s approach to integrating its logistics and sales data, and how it has enabled Sentury to provide better service to its customers.

Senior Editor,
Technology,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Eric Johnson

Co-Founder and CEO,
Crux Systems

Panelist

Eric Klein

Director,
Logistics and Supply Chain,
Sentury Tire

Panelist

Juan Tatis

11:00 — 11:30 AM

Networking Coffee Break

Location: Room 104 Foyer

11:30 AM — 12:30 PM

Dillon, South Carolina:
A Case Study in the Advantages Inland Ports Provide to Shippers

Location: Room 104B, First Floor

States across the US are spending hundreds of millions of dollars to build inland ports close to the coast in a bid to serve specific needs of certain shippers, while improving efficiency for others through their main terminals, and taking truck traffic off of already congested roads. Nowhere is this playing out more than in the mid- and South Atlantic, particularly Georgia, South Carolina, and Virginia, as 2016's Panama Canal expansion opened East Coast ports to 10,000-TEU and larger vessels, and the increasing cargo volumes and related throughput complications they present. In Georgia, CSX Transportation is serving the new Appalachian Regional Port near Chatsworth, with a capacity for 100,000 TEU a year. To the north, the Virginia Inland Port, an intermodal container transfer facility owned by the Virginia Port Authority, occupies 161 acres 60 miles west of Washington, DC, bringing the Port of Virginia 220 miles closer to inland markets. And South Carolina last fall opened its second inland port, in Dillon, building on the success of its 5-year-old Greer facility. This Case Study will examine the advantages inland ports provide to BCOs, through the eyes of Dillon, which is expected to convert 45,000 containers from truck to rail in its first full year of operation. Together with Greer, South Carolina’s initial inland port that opened in 2013, some 170,000 containers annually soon will be moving inland by rail rather than truck, creating new efficiencies for shippers and further easing congestion on roads around the port.

Executive Editor,
JOC.com
and The Journal of Commerce,  
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Mark Szakonyi

President and CEO,
South Carolina Ports Authority

Panelist

Jim Newsome

Vice President,
Supply Chain Operations,
Harbor Freight Tools

Panelist

Peter Racine

11:30 AM — 12:30 PM

The Missing Link in the Digital Supply Chain:
A Case Study on the Use of Smart Containers

Location: Room 104C, First Floor

Although not widely deployed yet outside the reefer space, smart containers are attracting interest and attention because of the real-time information they can provide and, importantly, for the information they generate that can feed into tools promoting predictive analytics and other data-based intelligence. Traxens, a leader in developing smart containers and with investment from Mediterranean Shipping Co. and CMA CGM, says its very creation emerged from “the vision that the multimodal container industry could make huge gains in efficiency, service, and protection of the planet if every company and every person in the supply chain has the right information at the right time.” Traxens’ innovations focus on hardware to drive down the cost of deployment of container monitoring and software to foster scalable big data processing and secure partitioned distribution. This case study, featuring chemical giant BASF, will explore Traxens’ approach to creating widespread usage of smart containers.

Senior Editor,
Technology,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Eric Johnson

Smart Container Commercial Project Leader,
MSC Mediterranean Shipping Company SA

Panelist

Kathryn Delecluse

Deputy Director,
Maritime Business Unit,
Traxens

Panelist

Thomas Nouvian

Digital Innovation Manager,
BASF Corporation

Panelist

Mark Schmitz

Location: Room 104C, 1st Floor

Lunch With Speaker

12:30 — 2:00 PM

Lars Jensen

Featured Speaker

CEO,
SeaIntelligence Consulting

Lars Jensen, one of the container shipping world’s leading thinkers, will publish his new book to coincide with TPM 2019. Picking up where his latest book, “Liner Shipping 2025,” left off, the book will discuss the intersection of carriers, ports, terminals, third-party logistics providers, and beneficial cargo owners. He believes there won’t be a single winning strategy, but rather a number of strategies matching different players’ market positions. In his new book and this speech, Jensen will dive into several themes, providing answers to a number of pressing questions, including: What are viable strategic choices for the main global carriers, but (perhaps more importantly) what new and viable strategic models will become available for niche carriers? What are the viable niches, and how can carriers best defend them? What are the viable strategic choices for ports and terminals, and how do they differ between hub-focused ports and import/export ports? What about if there is a single terminal in the port or multiple terminals competing? What are viable strategies for the ports and terminals when looking at the consolidation of market power across carriers and alliances? What are the most viable strategic paths in the intersection between carriers and 3PLs, between carriers and terminals (as evidenced again by DP World’s recent purchase of Unifeeder), and at the intersection between terminals and BCOs. Finally, how is the changing strategic landscape among carriers, terminals, and 3PLs giving rise to new procurement strategies and opportunities for BCOs? Attendees can expect a thought-provoking, probing, and occasionally controversial commentary in this wrap-up address at TPM 2019.

2:30 — 4:00 PM

Long Beach Port Tour

Location: Dock #9, outside Parker’s Lighthouse, Shoreline Village

The Port of Long Beach cordially invites TPM attendees to join a 90-minute harbor cruise that will tour many of the port facilities. The cruise will depart from Dock #9, just outside of Parker’s Lighthouse in Shoreline Village in downtown Long Beach and will last approximately 90 minutes. The tour will offer a close-up look at the many container terminals, on-dock rail yards, and diverse mix of cargo that makes the Port of Long Beach a world leader in goods movement. TPM attendees may use this opportunity to discuss with port representatives how the current and future challenges of trade growth are being handled at the Port of Long Beach.

STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY: All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.