Tuesday, 05 March 2019

7:00 AM — 6:00 PM

Registration

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Lobby

Sponsored by:

7:30 — 8:30 AM

Networking Breakfast

Location: 1st Floor

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Welcome Remarks and Log-Net eCommerce Excellence Award

8:30 — 8:45 AM

Stuart Strachan

Senior Vice President,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Log-Net's Electronic Commerce Excellence award has consistently reinforced the partnership between carriers and their customers and the fundamental importance of data quality in that relationship. Digitalization has made data management and data quality foundational elements of successful global supply chains. Whether the data is coming from smartphones, web forms, Internet of Things devices or EDI, it needs to be complete, timely, and accurate. Data quality is critical, considering the consumers of this information now range from import and logistics specialist to business intelligence and machine learning platforms that demand ever more granular information. For the past 16 years, LOG-NET CEO John Motley has presented the LOG-NET E-Commerce Excellence award. The award recognizes the efforts of the international carrier community and its outstanding daily performance with LOG-NET's Trading Partner and Data Quality teams.

Sponsored by:

Vice President,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Award Introduction

Peter Tirschwell

CEO,
Log-Net

Award Presenter

John Motley

lognet_fullcolor.jpg

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

A One-on-One Conversation With Maersk Line CEO Soren Skou

8:45 — 9:30 AM

Manager,
Asia Trade,
Halifax Port Authority

Session Introduction

Sam Zhang

Executive Director Content,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Peter Tirschwell

CEO,
A.P. Møller Mærsk A/S

Featured Speaker

Soren Skou

Soren Skou, who has been CEO of AP Moller-Maersk since 2016 and headed the Maersk container line for four years prior to that, is leading an unprecedented transformation for a container carrier into a new breed of logistics provider. It has begun offering end to end logistics services as part of a strategy to become an integrated carrier in container logistics. It announced in September that it "will combine its offering for ocean products and supply chain services to be able to offer more comprehensive end-to-end logistic solutions for cargo owners," accomplishing this by splitting its Damco logistics unit into supply chain services to be integrated into Maersk and a forwarding business that will be run separately. For a traditional container carrier that offered logistics services as a parallel versus integrated service, this direction is revolutionary. Driven by technology, Maersk is challenging assumptions about industry structure and prompting companies across the container value chain to re-think how they create value in a rapidly changing international logistics environment. In this in-depth conversation, we will discuss with Soren a range of topics in what will without a doubt be a fascinating dialogue.

Sponsored by:

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Sulfur 2020:
The Clock Is Ticking on the IMO's Latest Mandate

9:30 — 10:30 AM

John Hextall

Session Introduction

Chief Executive Officer,
DE WELL GROUP

Mark Szakonyi

Session Chair

Executive Editor,
JOC.com
and The Journal of Commerce,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Rolf Habben Jansen

Panelist

CEO,
Hapag-Lloyd

Stephen Jew

Panelist

Associate Director,
Oil Markets, Midstream,
Downstream & Chemical,
IHS Markit

Matt Muenster

Panelist

Senior Manager,
Applied Knowledge,
Breakthrough Fuel

The global low-sulfur mandate that will take effect on Jan. 1, 2020, presents a potentially existential crisis to the container shipping industry and its customers. Despite having a poor record of recovering fuel cost increases from shippers, carriers will have to recoup an estimated tens of billions of dollars in extra cost or risk collapse. Customer sentiment regarding the additional costs ranges from full acceptance to a willingness to take on some costs, but wanting carriers to take the rest out of their own margins. Chronically profit-challenged carriers, unsurprisingly, respond, “What margins?” The low-sulfur rule, which will impact annual service contracts and spot rates, also could trigger further slow-steaming, according to carriers' own warnings, and, as a result, tighter capacity. The higher fuel costs could reduce the attractiveness of all-water trans-Pacific services. And if carriers are unable to recoup the costs of meeting the mandate — via more costly fuel, scrubbers, or converting to LNG power -- they will likely resort to one of the few cards they still hold: slashing capacity. To avoid a potential repeat of 2010, when carriers pulled significant capacity and severely disrupted shippers' supply chains, it would be ideal if both sides could accept the challenge they collectively face and agree to find a way forward through transparency and cooperation. This panel of experts will detail the risks to the industry, the potential scenarios, and what’s needed from shippers and carriers in the final months to avoid a bunker fuel backlash.

Sponsored by:

10:30 — 11:00 AM

Networking Break

Location: 1st Floor

11:00 AM — 12:00 PM

View From the Top:
A Conversation With Industry Leaders

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Donovan Murray

Session Introduction

General Manager,
Intermodal / Trade Development,
Maryland Port Administration

Sarah Barnes-Humphrey

Session Chair

Co-Founder and CEO,
Shipz Inc,
and Founder and Host,
"Let's Talk Supply Chain"

John McCauley

Panelist

Vice President,
Transportation and Logistics,
Cargill

Jeremy Nixon

Panelist

Global CEO,
One Network Express

Kim Vaccaro

Panelist

Senior Manager,
International Operations,
Home Depot

Peder Winther

Panelist

Global Head,
Ocean Freight,
Panalpina

Sponsored by:

What is the perspective and outlook of industry leaders as we get deeper into 2019, a year that could prove to be pivotal for international logistics? As we look forward into 2019 and beyond, how do industry leaders see their segments of the industry evolving? Where do they see risks in the international supply chain? Will technology finally be transformational or will it remain incremental in its impact? What will be the impact of regulatory mandates such as the IMO 2020 low-sulfur fuel regulation or the California mandate to achieve zero emissions on marine terminals by 2030? Consolidation among container carriers has led to increasingly divergent strategies among the few remaining incumbents and is creating new pressures between carriers and forwarders. In this industry leaders’ session, we will have a lively discussion with a group of bona-fide industry leaders about how they see the future unfolding in 2019 and beyond.

12:00 — 12:30 PM

TPM Accelerator:
The New World

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Director of Business Development, Performance Team

Session Introduction

Mac Forehand

Senior Editor, Technology,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Introduction

Eric Johnson

Founder and CEO,
WiseTech Global

Featured Speaker

Richard White

We’re speeding toward a world where digitization, integration, automation, and machine learning are essential to managing margins, lifting customer service, and maintaining competitive advantage. Within this new ecosystem, human capital will refocus on intricate problem solving, complex decisions, and increased customer touch, while machines will assist in driving growth and reliability. We’ll be faster, more reliable, more effective. and mundane tasks, grindingly repetitive, boring work, will eliminated — converted into automated systems. WiseTech Global CEO Richard White has created a technology company worth more than $5 billion by doing things differently as part of a relentless commitment to reaching this new world. With 34 of the top 50 global third-party logistics providers, and 24 of the 25 largest global freight forwarders as WiseTech customers, he isn’t alone in how he sees it. In this highly anticipated talk, White will explore where the logistics industry is heading, the growing chasm between historical titans and an emerging vanguard, and who will lead the transformation and how they will go about it. He will look at the convergence of technologies and the mindset needed to get and stay in front in the fast-changing, fast-growing global logistics industry.

Sponsored by:

12:30 — 1:45 PM

Networking Lunch

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Regency & Beacon Ballrooms

1:45 — 2:45 PM

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

Negotiating Contracts IV:
Carrier vs. Merchant Haulage

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

With many ocean carriers trying to reduce their exposure to door-to-door delivery within annual service contracts, beneficial cargo owners face increasing pressure to handle inland transportation, including drayage and regional shipments, themselves Because it captures the entire transaction in a single invoice, carrier haulage can be much simpler for the BCO than merchant haulage, which involves multiple bills from different service providers each arriving at a different time. Carrier haulage allows the BCO to avoid time spent on coordinating and booking intermodal, drayage, or truckload capacity and ensuring that all the legs of the journey connect together. Trucking companies prefer merchant haulage, however, because it often eliminates chassis splits, which can waste time and increase costs. This panel of experts will analyze the different strategies for contracting haulage, how shippers can gain greater control of their inland transportation, and how to better calibrate a strategy for timely and predictable door delivery.

Ari Ashe

Session Chair

Associate Editor,
Southeast Ports and
Intermodal Rail,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Mike Gavle

Panelist

Vice President,
Global Operations,
Rockport Group

Dave Manning

Panelist

President & CEO,
North American Chassis
Pool Cooperative
Immediate Past Chairman,
ATA
Co-Chair of the Truck Pac,
TTA

Michael A. Symonanis

Panelist

Director,
North America Logistics,
Global Container Logistics Group,
Louis Dreyfus Company

Dean Tracy

Panelist

Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer,
RCS Logistics

Longshore Labor in an Era of Stability

Location: Room 102, 1st Floor

The longshore unions and employer organizations in 2017 successfully extended the existing coastwide contracts until 2022 for the ILWU and 2024 for the ILA. While the contract extensions will guarantee labor stability into the next decade, the demands for improving cargo-handling productivity will continue to mount now that vessels up to 14,000 TEU are calling at ports on the East and West coasts. The PMA, USMX, ILWU and ILA can’t be lulled into complacency for the next three to five years of labor peace, but rather must address the pressing issues surrounding automation, dockworker training in an era of computerization, maintenance and repair of equipment, especially chassis, and guaranteeing sufficient manning levels to handle cargo surges. APM Terminals’ January’s announcement that it intends to automate a 100-acre portion of its massive terminal in Los Angeles is another indication that the hot-button issue of automation is present on both coasts. However, the ILA’s opposition to full automation and autonomous cargo-handling equipment is in stark contrast to the ILWU’s decision dating from the 2008 West Coast contract to accept full automation in return for generous pension benefits. Training programs for longshore workers also will be a crucial issue in the coming few years as dockworkers learn new skills in order to be able to claim jurisdiction over jobs created by computerization. Similarly, the maintenance and repair of chassis and cargo-handling equipment is evolving, and the two longshore unions with their respective employers have different approaches to training workers for those newly created jobs on the two coasts. Finally, the repair and inspection of chassis now that ocean carriers have relinquished their chassis continues to be a complex and controversial challenge. Now that most of the chassis are owned by intermodal equipment providers, which have no contractual relationship with the ILA and ILWU, the employer organizations representing shipping lines and terminal operators face challenges from their respective unions that demand they retain jurisdiction over those jobs. In this highly anticipated interactive session, JOC senior editors Bill Mongelluzzo and Hugh Morley will discuss the latest developments involving longshore labor issues, and encourage comments from the longshore labor interests and employers who are expected to attend the session.

Senior Editor,
West Coast,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit 

Session Leader

Bill Mongelluzzo

Senior Editor,
US Northeast and Mexico,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit 

Session Leader

Hugh Morley

What It Takes to Be a Logistics Leader
at a BCO Organization

Location: Room 103, First Floor

Is it possible for those in transportation and logistics roles at BCO companies to become leaders within their organizations? Is it possible to elevate the profile of logistics so it’s understood and appreciated companywide, including at the C-level, not just as a cost but as a creator of value providing real support to company objectives such as growth in revenue and profit? For nearly 13 years as vice president of global logistics at Elextrolux, Bjorn Vang Jensen, has answered these questions with an unqualified “Yes.” You would be hard pressed to find a more high profile and dynamic leader within the BCO community. He has left behind the idea that logistics is “out of sight, out of mind” until something goes wrong, turning it into a source of credibility and respect within a large global organization. He has developed relationships up to the CEO and has the confidence of the company to engage extensively outside the company whether in speaking engagements and in helping develop next-generation technology such as by sitting on the board of the New York Shipping Exchange. In this one-hour conversation, Bjorn will discuss in detail what it takes to become an organizational and industry leader in transportation and logistics.

Senior Vice President
and General Manager,
INTTRA by E2open

Session Introduction

Santosh Nanda

Vice President, Content,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Peter Tirschwell

Vice President,
Global Supply Chain,
Electrolux

Featured Speaker

Bjorn Vang Jensen

Sponsored by:

Cool Cargoes I: 
2019 Outlook — Preparing BCOs
for a Disruptive Year Ahead

Location: Room 104B, 1st Floor

2019 promises to be a defining year for cold chain interests as compliance with the International Maritime Organization’s low-sulfur regulations for 2020 expected to impact the conventional reefer sector especially hard. Some sources project the new fuel regulations could prompt a shift toward containerization, which could generate growth in containerized reefer shipments of 10 percent or more. This raises a number of strategic questions: Who will be able to finance investments in more equipment? Who benefits? Will beneficial cargo owners have to pay more for their cargo? Will there be enough cold storage capacity to support the organic growth? Refrigerated ocean shipping rates, meanwhile, are expected to continue to increase at a faster pace than rates for dry cargo as increasing demand puts pressure on an already-tight equipment market. Average reefer rates globally are up about 3 percent since the start of 2017, while dry ocean rates have declined by 14 percent in the same period, according to industry analyst Drewry. This panel will explore the outlook for the global reefer market, lay out the challenges BCOs face, and discuss strategic options for the disruptive year ahead.

Sponsored by:

Hans Bean

Session Introduction

Senior Vice President of Trade Development,
North Carolina Ports 

Thomas Eskesen

Session Chair

Founder,
Eskesen Advisory

Bharadwaj Bhuyan

Panelist

Senior Manager,
Marketing & Commercial,
Ocean Network Express (ONE)

Anne-Sophie Zerlang Karlsen

Panelist

Global Head of Reefer Management,
Maersk Line

Neal J. Rider

Panelist

Founder and CEO,

EmergentCold

Robert Sappio

Panelist

CEO,
SeaCube Container Leasing Ltd.

2:45 — 3:15 PM

Networking Break

Location: 1st Floor

Sponsored by:

3:15 — 4:15 PM

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

Negotiating Contracts V:
Detention and Demurrage — Managing Complex Relationships and Escalating Costs

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Detention and demurrage costs shippers millions of dollars annually, and while maritime regulators are trying to give the industry a path to better clarity about who should be responsible for such charges, shippers, truckers, and marine terminals shouldn’t hold their breath for a government solution. What seems like a simple proposition — a window to pick up your container or else pay a penalty — is actually complicated. When does the clock begin and end, and how long is the clock? And what happens when a BCO can’t retrieve its container in time? This session will explore ways to minimize detention and demurrage fees. Is information the key to solving the this problem? If BCOs can reliably forecast when a container will be ready, can they plan better with their truckers? And how can stakeholders come together to transmit reliable information in a timely manner? Even with better planning, however, unforeseen events will happen occasionally. Panelists will discuss strategies for shippers and marine terminals to avoid detention and demurrage, and how to negotiate when fees are incurred.

Associate Editor,
Southeast Ports and Intermodal Rail, JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Ari Ashe

Vice President,
Supply Chain and Customs Policy,
National Retail Federation

Panelist

Jonathan Gold

Director, Global Logistics,
Solvay Technology Solutions

Panelist

Siva Narayanan

CEO,
Oney Consulting

Panelist

Jack Oney

Manager,
North American Marine Category,
Eastman Chemical

Panelist

Klaus Schnede

Technology IV:
Innovations in Port Efficiency

Location: Room 102, 1st Floor

North American seaports are a critical hub for global supply chains yet also a confounding bottleneck for shippers. That’s mostly because terminals have been set up to be optimized within their facility boundaries, but not necessarily within the broader framework of the parties interacting with those terminals. Terminal operating systems have been the means for terminals to improve optimization of their own operations, but those systems don’t connect well enough to systems used by beneficial cargo owners or the freight forwarders and drayage providers designated by BCOs to pick up or drop off containers. But the need for shippers to get better data around the availability of cargo, and the need to better coordinate drayage operations with that availability, is precipitating technology-led progress at North American ports. In short, new systems, new data gathering, and new operational concepts are driving better connectivity between port and landside cargo management systems. This session will explore the tactical results of those innovations, including ways to foster more dual transactions for drayage drivers — where they can drop off empties or export cargo and pick up import boxes in the same move — and better cargo fluidity and visibility for shippers, among a host of other technological innovations at play. The session also will explore the practical issues of integrating these systems, and whether modern terminal operating systems are equipped to nurture these innovations.

Eric Johnson

Session Chair

Senior Editor, Technology,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Karri Lehtonen

Panelist

COO,
Youredi

Weston LaBar

Panelist

President and CEO,

Harbor Trucking Association

James Swanston

Panelist

CEO,
Voyage Control

Cool Cargoes II:
Supply Chain Execution —
Best Practices in an Increasingly Demanding Market

Location: Room 104B, First Floor

The movement of perishable products in the cold chain is growing faster than the overall market as an expanding middle class worldwide puts increasing consumption demand on agricultural growers and frozen and chilled food providers. Although the ability to control and manage the flow of goods to consumers has become more visible than ever, consumer demands have likewise never been higher. Customers expect service that delivers what they promised and paid for, so an ability to develop and execute a strategic transportation plan is essential. It’s no longer good enough to say you have the best solutions at the most economical cost; you need to demonstrate it on a consistent basis. The often-said phrase “time is money” is even more pronounced in the perishable environment, where the delivery of products that are timely, traceable, and in top quality isn’t a desire, but a necessity. This panel of cold chain experts will share best practices for shippers and their transportation and logistics service providers.

William C. Duggan Jr.

Session Chair

North America Cold Chain Adviser,
Eskesen Advisory

Christian Allred

Panelist

Senior Vice President and
General Manager,
International Sales for EMEA (Europe, Middle East and Africa), Latin America and Asia Pacific,
ORBCOMM

Frank Ganse

Panelist

Senior Vice President
and Global Head,
Reefer Logistics,
Kuehne + Nagel

Thomas Holt

Panelist

Chairman,
Holt Logistics

Gary Winstead

Panelist

CEO,
A.R.C. Transit Cos.

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Beacon Ballroom

The Golden Apple of Opportunity —
Defining the New Professional Ecosystem

3:15 — 5:15 PM

Senior Editor,
Breakbulk and Heavy-Lift, JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Leader

Janet Nodar

Chief Operations Officer,
The Noble Capital

Session Leader

Lisa Verdon

Co-Founder and
CEO of Shipz Inc,
and Founder and Host,
"Let's Talk Supply Chain"

Featured Speaker

Sarah Barnes-Humphrey

Executive Vice President,
National Sales,
IMC Compaines

Featured Speaker

Donna Lemm

Co-Founder and CEO,
Shippabo

Featured Speaker

Nina Luu

Vice President,
Transportation and Logistics,
Cargill

Featured Speaker

John McCauley

Vice President,
Transportation,
Home Depot

Featured Speaker

Michelle Livingstone

Chief Operating Officer,
South Carolina Ports Authority

Featured Speaker

Barbara L. Melvin

President and CEO,
South Carolina Ports Authority

Featured Speaker

James I. Newsome III

Co-Founder,
Devon Consulting

Featured Speaker

Angela Reno

This first-of-its-kind TPM session will provide strategies and guidelines for helping transportation professionals further develop their careers in the ever-changing business demography. In order to achieve balance in the workplace, a deeper understanding of the diverse styles, attitudes, and values of all participants, regardless of age, gender, nationality or race, must be fully recognized and understood. Empower your business bottom line by encouraging men and women leaders to support and inspire future leaders to work through workplace challenges so that the Golden Apple of Opportunity lands to the most qualified. Among the challenges and lessons to be addressed during individual breakouts in this two-hour, interactive session will be:

 

  • Speak Up and Be Heard: Developing effective leadership communication skills

  • Strengthening Your Network: Building alliances with corporate influencers and decision-makers

  • Stand in Your Success: Sharing qualifications, one accomplishment at a time

  • Negotiating Success: Enhancing your bargaining skills


The final 30 minutes of this engaging session will feature a dedicated networking reception, giving attendees direct access to our speakers and others.

Sponsored by:

4:15 — 5:15 PM

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

Navigating Complexity
at North America’s Largest Port Complex:
An Importers’ Guide to Los Angeles-Long Beach

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Bill Mongelluzzo

Session Chair

Senior Editor, West Coast,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit 

Alan McCorkle

Panelist

Senior Vice President,
West Coast Operations,
Yusen Terminals

Sean Pierce

Panelist

President and CEO,
Fenix Marine Services

Importers who ship through Los Angeles-Long Beach face unique and complex operational challenges. Some two dozen ocean carriers and three vessel-sharing alliances call at the ports’ 12 privately operated container terminals, generating more than 8.5 million TEU of loaded import containers a year. Due to the two-port rotation of services in the Pacific Southwest, where ships call at Los Angeles-Long Beach and Oakland only, vessels discharge and reload 80 to 100 percent of their cargo during each vessel call Southern California complex, regularly generating 10,000 or more container moves. BCOs and their truckers face mandatory appointment requirements. They compete for the use of 65,000 chassis in the nation’s first pool of pools and pay PierPass traffic-mitigation fees to support the only US portwide program that offers 80 hours of gate openings each week. Containers and the chassis that carry them are dispersed over on-dock, near-dock and regional railyards, and trucked to warehouses totaling more than 1.5 billion square feet of distribution space throughout California, resulting in constant chassis and empty container dislocations. Approximately 52 percent of the containers are returned empty to a terminal other than the terminal they arrived at. On the other hand, Los Angeles-Long Beach has been the incubator for cutting-edge operational efficiencies such as container dray-offs and peel-off piles, and the monthly publishing of truck turn times at each of the dozen container terminals. Will the Port Optimizer developed by the Port of Los Angeles and GE Transportation prove to be the single portal that stakeholders need to receive and dispense shipment information for all customers and vendors up to two weeks before vessel arrival? All BCOs attending TPM 2019 are invited to attend an off-the-record session to air their gripes, learn about the latest operational developments, and offer their perspective on how to make the largest US port gateway more efficient.

Building a Complete North American Supply Chain Strategy: Why Mexico's Time Has Come

Location: Room 102, First Floor

Mexico’s rapidly growing manufacturing capability, especially its automotive sector, is raising the country’s potential as a source, and, as the economy develops, a market, too. That potential, however, is tempered by the daunting mix of security concerns, political uncertainty, and questions over tight trucking capacity that torment the country and can scare off shippers — not to mention the unpredictability of frequently being in the Trump administration’s crosshairs. Yet a host of changes sweeping through the country could make 2019 the year Mexico begins to live up to its potential. With a new president, Andrés Manuel López Obrador inaugurated on Dec. 1, the country will have a new direction, though the cloud of uncertainty from the NAFTA negotiations remains because the US Congress must approve the replacement USMCA agreement, and newly empowered Democrats are signaling that they want to see revisions. In June, the first phase will begin on an expansion that eventually will increase capacity fivefold at the 900,000-TEU-a-year Port of Veracruz, making it Mexico’s largest port by far. Cargo volumes through the port are rising rapidly — up 18 percent in 2017, to nearly 860,000 TEU — and a small but growing number of shippers is moving cargo to the US by sea, instead of truck. This panel will look at the changing climate in Mexico and the logistical challenges and benefits of making Mexico a key element of shipper supply chains, and how to avoid the pitfalls.

Senior Editor, 
US Northeast and Mexico, 
JOC, Maritime & Trade, 
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Hugh Morley

Director, Latin America
and Caribbean Economics,

IHS Markit

Panelist

Rafael Amiel

Managing Director,
CONTECON Manzanillo

Panelist

Fortino Landeros Ruiz

Category Manager,
Ocean and Air,
The Chemours Company

Panelist

David Sekula

Associate Director Intermodal,
Werner Enterprises,
México

Panelist

Humberto Vargas

Navigating the Automotive Supply Chain:
An Interactive Workshop for Auto Parts Shippers

Location: Room 103, 1st Floor

Logistics and the supply chain are an underappreciated profit center in much of the automotive aftermarket industry, and this BCO-only, off-the-record discussion will educate shippers about how to extract more value out of their ocean shipping practices to improve profitability and protect against unexpected increases in transportation costs. Topics of discussion will include how to gain a thorough understanding of shipping supply and demand, regulation, fuel costs, and tariffs issues. Other topics of discussion will include modal-mix and gateway strategies; contract negotiations and terms; optimum strategies for procurement channels; and risks facing ocean shippers in the coming year. Led by Steven Hughes, a former vice president of auto components importer Centric Parts and now president and CEO of automotive aftermarket consultant HCS International, this interactive workshop is a must-attend event for auto parts shippers looking to optimize their supply chains, increase efficiency, and reduce costs.

Shipper Relationship Manager,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Workshop Leader

Dustin Braden

President and CEO,
HCS International – Representing Global Shippers Group
to the Automotive Aftermarket

Workshop Leader

Steven Hughes

Chief Operating Officer,
Gemini Shippers Group

Workshop Leader

Kenneth O'Brien

Cool Cargoes III:

The BCO Perspective — What's Working
and What Isn't?

Location: Room 104B, 1st Floor

The demanding requirements associated with the transportation and logistics of perishable goods puts the onus on cold chain providers — ocean carriers, ports, cold storage providers/3PLs, and others — to deliver world-class products and services that support an integrated cold chain. Unfortunately for refrigerated shippers, improper handling of cargo and service failures that can be avoided or mitigated continue to occur at unacceptable rates. Ultimately, the industry — beneficial cargo owners and their cold chain partners — have a shared responsibility to better understand each other's challenges and commit to closer collaboration in order to achieve common goals such as compliance, safety, and security. In this wrap-up session to the TPM Cool Cargoes track, refrigerated BCOs representing various segments of the industry will offer a candid look at the global reefer market in a roundtable discussion that not only will address what’s working, but more importantly, what’s not and how it can be fixed.

Editorial Director,
AC Business Media's 
Supply Chain Network
(Includes Food Logistics
and Supply & Demand
Chain Executive

Session Chair

Lara Sowinski

CEO,
Tropical Division,
Fyffes North America

Panelist

Juan Alarcon

Managing Director,
Wine and Spirits Association

Panelist

Alison Leavitt

International Logistics Manager, JBS USA

Panelist

Jakob Sadd

Director, Global Transportation
and Logistics,
AJC International

Panelist

Chris Swartz

5:15 — 7:15 PM

Networking Reception

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Pool Deck

Sponsored by:

STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY: All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.