Monday, 04 March 2019

7:00 AM — 6:00 PM

Registration

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Lobby

Sponsored by:

7:30 — 8:30 AM

Networking Breakfast

Location: 1st Floor

Sponsored by:

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Welcome Remarks

8:30 — 9:00 AM

Peter Tirschwell

Executive Director Content,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

President,

Long Beach Board of
Harbor Commissioners

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Keynote Address

9:00 — 9:45 AM

Peter Tirschwell

Introduction

Executive Director Content,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Daniel Yergin

Keynote Speaker

Vice Chairman,
IHS Markit

The Pulitzer-Prize winning author of "The Prize," and "The Quest," Dr. Daniel Yergin is a global authority on energy, international politics and economics and vice chairman of IHS Markit. He founded the world-renowned energy consulting firm Cambridge Energy Research Associates (which, like the JOC, is now part of IHS Markit) and is chairman of CERA Week, the leading global energy conference held annually in Houston, also part of IHS Markit. According to Time Magazine, “If there is one man whose opinion matters more than any other on global energy markets, it’s Daniel Yergin.” Fortune said he is “one of the planet’s foremost thinkers about energy and its implications.” The New York Times described him as “America’s most influential energy pundit.” His awards include Lifetime Achievement from the prime minister of India and the United States Energy Award for lifelong achievements in energy and the promotion of international understanding. His presentation will be especially timely in light of the more than 30 percent drop in crude prices since early October and the Jan. 1, 2020, IMO sulfur cap on bunker fuel.

Sponsored by:

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

The Economic and Trade Outlook:
A Presentation by IHS Markit Chief Economist Dr. Nariman Behravesh

9:45 — 10:15 AM

CEO,
Laufer Group International Ltd.

Session Introduction

Mark Laufer

Executive Director Content,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Introduced By

Peter Tirschwell

Chief Economist,
IHS Markit

Featured Speaker

As of this fall, IHS Markit Chief Economist Nariman Behravesh was revising growth forecasts downward because of pressures on the global economy and trade tensions between the US and China that were running high despite the Dec. 2 agreement to suspend US tariffs on Chinese goods for 90 days. According to Nariman, "With the exception of the United States, every key economy has seen slower growth this year relative to last year, and will continue to see weak or even weaker growth over the next two years. A number of factors have contributed to this less rosy global picture, including the gradual removal of liquidity, higher oil prices, and the elevated level of trade tensions — especially between the US and China. The recent surge in financial volatility — a de-facto tightening of financial conditions — is an unwelcome addition to these threats to global growth. Even without a full-blown bear market, the combined effects of policy uncertainty and large financial gyrations are hurting business sentiment and capital spending." One symptom of the contentious trade environment is a fall in the IHS Markit PMI (purchasing managers index) for global export orders for the first time in more than two years. Putting all of this together, IHS Markit (parent company of the JOC) predicts that world GDP growth will edge down from 3.2 percent in 2018 to 3.0 percent in 2019 and 2.9 percent in 2020, he said. Nariman will return to TPM in 2019, offering his characteristically lucid and highly informed and forward-looking analysis of the US and global economies as they relate to containerized trade volumes in 2019 and beyond.

Sponsored by:

10:15 — 10:45 AM

Networking Break

Location: 1st Floor

Sponsored by:

10:45 AM — 12:00 PM

Container Shipping Outlook:
Will the Tight Capacity of Late 2018 Carry Over to 2019?

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Neil Barni

Session Introduction

Managing Director,
CargoSphere

Session Chair

Executive Editor,
JOC.com
and The Journal of Commerce,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Panelist

Director and Operational Head,
Drewry Supply Chain Advisors

Panelist

Head of European Transport Equity Research
and Global Transport Research Coordinator,
Credit Suisse 

Panelist

President,
North America,
Hapag-Lloyd

The supply and demand picture headed into 2019 in the trans-Pacific is evolving picture, with container growth negatively impacted by the US-China trade war and carriers' determination to create favorable market conditions ahead of crucial 2019-2020 annual negotiations for contracts that will extend well beyond Jan. 1, 2020 when carriers will be forced to use higher priced low-sulfur fuel for the vast majority of the container ship fleet. Carriers’ actions in mid-2018 to withdraw capacity from the trans-Pacific amid the peak-season rush combined with accelerated imports to avoid China tariffs led to the highest TP eastbound spot rates in five years though rates have since dropped. A growing consensus is that especially after Chinese New Year in February, trans-Pacific volumes will slow, and carriers are already saying they will respond to such a slowdown by withdrawing further capacity. “What we plan for now, is that we have to take out a lot of capacity on trans-Pacific trade next year,” Maersk CEO Soren Skou told Bloomberg on Nov. 14 upon the carrier’s 3Q earnings release. “There will be a high level of inventory build-up which needs to be brought down again and that will affect volumes.” The Jan. 1 2020 implementation date of the IMO sulfur cap provides carriers with a significant incentive to shore up their position in the world’s largest container trade lane to ensure that 2019-2020 annual contracts will enable them to recoup what is expected to be billions in added costs from having to use low-sulfur fuel as of that date. There are early indications that carriers are taking a hard line in insisting on recouping these costs but it's still early days in the annual negotiating cycle. This panel will go into depth on how this scenario will play out, based on what we know as of early March, offering a range of viewpoints.

Sponsored by:

12:00 — 12:30 PM

TPM Accelerator:
A Carrier Perspective on Technology

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Greg Pearson

Vice President,
Investments (West Region),
CenterPoint Properties

 

Session Introduction

Senior Editor, Logistics Technology, JOC, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

Introduction

Andre Simha

Global Chief Information Officer,
MSC Mediterranean Shipping Company S.A.

Featured Speaker

Startups and venture capitalists notwithstanding, where ocean carriers choose to go with technology will have a significant impact on the overall industry direction and adoption of new solutions. The reason is that much of the data shippers need to optimize their supply chains originates from carriers, so accuracy, timeliness, and channels through which data flows (such as EDI or APIs) is critical in regards to maximizing the potential for improving shipper supply chains through data. The carriers as a group took a step in the direction of improving data by announcing plans last fall to collectively harmonize data standards. That’s why we’re delighted to welcome to TPM André Simha, Mediterranean Shipping Co.’s global chief information officer and a 30-plus-year veteran of world’s second-largest container carrier. Simha is a leader of carriers’ effort to improve data standards. As shipping analyst Lars Jensen told Splash, “Standards are not a source of competitive advantage for any single stakeholder in the industry, but the lack thereof leads to an unconnected patchwork of solutions benefiting neither the carriers nor the shippers.” Born and raised in Geneva, Simha joined MSC in 1987 and has been responsible for implementing and developing the complex data flow between the company’s headquarters and its agencies worldwide. Between 2000 and 2014, he also served as a director of INTTRA, the multi-carrier e-commerce network for the ocean shipping industry, which was sold recently to the supply chain software firm E2Open. This promises to be a fascinating presentation giving insights on how technology will unfold in coming years. 

Sponsored by:

12:30 — 2:00 PM

Lunch With Speaker: Disruption Sucks … Until it Doesn’t!

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Regency & Beacon Ballrooms

Sara Vollmer

Session Introduction

Vice President,
Strategic Customer Development-Retail & FMCG,
Kuehne + Nagel

Cindy Praeger

Featured Speaker

Co-Founder and
Managing Partner,
Rhythm Systems

The brutal fact is that disruption across the international logistics supply chain and the broader business world is here or is coming — whether we like it or not. We see it all over in logistics, whether it’s Maersk and CMA CGM creating end-to-end services, or Amazon entering international forwarding, not to mention the growing maturity of several disruptive technologies. Whether you’re a supply chain disruptor or legacy provider, looking at patterns for success outside the freight transportation industry can lead to a fresh perspective, and new ideas to build your business. Cindy Praeger is a compelling and engaging speaker known for sharing practical insights to help companies grow and thrive. She is co-founder of Rhythm Systems, a software and services company that has helped its clients develop and execute more than 10,000 growth plans, and has a unique perspective on how they played out — what worked and what didn’t. In this compelling and actionable presentation that will relate to executives in transportation and logistics, Praeger will share behind-the-scenes stories from two industry-leading companies (in health care and financial technology), explain some of the key moves they made to become market leaders, and apply them to the evolving challenges companies up and down the supply chain face on a daily basis. Her promise: You’ll leave with at least one practical idea to implement immediately in your firm.

 

Following her lunch presentation, Praeger will be available in Room 104B at the Long Beach Convention Center for face-to-face interaction and discussion about your specific questions.

Sponsored by:

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Negotiating Contracts I:
Insights for BCOs

2:00 — 3:00 PM

Mike Erickson

Session Introduction

CEO,

AFMS

Peter Tirschwell

Session Chair

Executive Director Content,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Rachael Acker

Panelist

Logistics Manager,
Wolverine Worldwide (WWW)

George Goldman

Panelist

President,
Zim USA

Nina Luu

Panelist

Co-Founder and CEO,
Shippabo

Chuck McDaniel

Panelist

Founder,
McDaniel Consulting

John Westwood

Panelist

Senior Manager,

Transportation Practice,

Chainalytics

There are the ABCs of negotiating contracts with carriers and then there are the realities of specific years given the unique circumstances that prevail. The 2019-2020 contracts will be heavily influenced by unique circumstances, including how the IMO 2020 sulfur cap should be approached, the expected supply-demand outlook, how to play the question of carrier versus merchant haulage, opportunities to negotiate for extended free time, insurance, and the potential viability of multi-year contracts. The overall approach irrespective of year should be one of seeking to leverage openings where you can but being mindful, especially in what is expected to be an unpredictable year ahead, of the need to avoid having your cargo paying the lowest rate (and thus be more vulnerable to rollings), to maintain good carrier relationships, and to provide accurate forecasts of expected near-term cargo volumes, as difficult as that can be in practice. This session will discuss the ABCs in the context of the approaching 2019-2020 contract year.

Sponsored by:

3:00 — 3:30 PM

Networking Break

Location: 1st Floor

Sponsored by:

3:30 — 4:30 PM

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

Negotiating Contracts II:

Accurately Forecasting Cargo Volumes for Carriers

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Forecasting cargo volumes and space needs has always been a thorny issue among BCOs and ocean carriers, one beset by most large-volume shippers’ inability to accurately predict the capacity they’ll need week-to-week across their carriers and forwarders with any granularity. The problem is one of space and time: Producing an accurate allocation forecast enough weeks out and with enough specificity by carrier and forwarder requires technology that measures a number of key variables. But it also takes a commitment from BCOs to share data with their carriers and non-vessel-operating common carriers, often via a forwarder that manages bookings on behalf of the BCO. Not many shippers — even large-volume ones — have this capability. That creates uncertainty for carriers in network planning, an issue that can ricochet on shippers when they need to increase their allocation for a week, only to learn the capacity isn’t there to handle it. At its most basic level, accurate container allocation forecasting is about ensuring that the flow of products remains unimpeded. This session will explore how a major retailer has built its allocation forecasting capability, how cloud-based software can enable this evolution, and the knock-on effects of more accurate forecasting on carriers and drayage operators.

Sponsored by:

Director of Sales,
Amber Road

Session Introduction

Jim Weitekamp

Senior Editor, Technology,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Eric Johnson

Senior Vice President,
Commercial and Agency Network,
CMA CGM

Panelist

Mathieu Friedberg

Director,
Global Logistics,
Walmart Stores

Panelist

Anthony Mc Auley

Senior Vice President,
Global Order Management,
Expeditors

Panelist

Michelle Weaver

US Exports in Turmoil:
What’s Ahead After a Brutal 2018

Location: Room 102, 1st Floor

After inching up 1.4 percent in 2017, US containerized exports struggled in 2018 as the weight of an ongoing trade war with China came crashing down. The series of tariffs and retaliatory tariffs implemented by Washington and Beijing, combined with previous Chinese policies aimed at cleaning up its environment and focusing more on its domestic economy, resulted in a 22 percent decline in US exports to the country in the first 10 months of the year, to 1.8 million TEU, according to data from IHS Markit, parent company of the JOC. Although double-digit increases in exports to India and Vietnam picked up some of the slack, it wasn’t nearly enough to overcome the dramatic slide to China, by far the largest destination for US goods. Overall, US exports in the first 10 months of 2018 rose 2.6 percent to 10.6 million TEU as the rush to beat tariffs masked weakness in key US export sectors, according to IHS Markit data. Wastepaper, cotton, fruits and nuts, electronic equipment, and alcoholic beverages all declined in the first 10 months of the year from the same period a year earlier. But there are also optimistic signs: the US and China agreed to a 90-day cease-fire in the tariff battle, and the two sides are talking again (though barring an agreement, the deadline for new tariffs will hit as TPM gets underway). And China, which stopped buying US soybeans last summer, agreed in December to purchase 1.1 million metric tons of the agricultural staple. With uncertainty rife, this session will analyze the outlook for containerized US exports, how shippers and service providers are adapting to the new dynamic, and where the new risks and potential opportunities lie.

Sponsored by:

Ashley Craig

Session Introduction

Co-Chair,
International Trade
and Logistics Group,
Venable

Bill Mongelluzzo

Session Chair

Senior Editor,
West Coast,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit 

Lawrence Burns

Panelist

Senior Vice President,
Trade and Sales,
Hyundai Merchant Marine 

Kimberly Cockrell

Panelist

Vice President,
Sales and Marketing,
New York Shipping Exchange

Mike Steenhoek

Panelist

Executive Director,
Soy Transportation Coalition

April Zobel

Panelist

Manager,
Export Traffic,
The Andersons Inc.

Trucking I:
Will a Crash Follow the Crunch?

Location: Room 103, 1st Floor

The mother of all trucking capacity crises throttled inland distribution channels in 2018, thanks to high import volumes and enforcement of the electronic logging device mandate. Capacity began to creep back in the fall as transportation networks found a new balance, but demand for drayage, truckload and less-than-truckload capacity remained strong, and truck utilization rates were high, keeping pressure on pricing. Will 2019 bring relief? Will slower economic growth mean more capacity, or will growing complexity and other obstacles keep capacity tight? What can beneficial cargo owners do to ensure access to the capacity they need in drayage and over-the-road trucking? This session will analyze the state of the market and various strategies, from dedicated drayage to the spot markets, BCOs can use to lock down capacity.

Sponsored by:

President,
Emerge

Session Introduction

Grant Crawford

Senior Editor,
Trucking,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

William Cassidy

Chief Operating Officer,
BlueGrace Logistics 

Panelist

Mark Ford

Co-Founder and
Chief Executive Officer,
Arrive Logistics

Panelist

Matt Pyatt

Vice President,
Supply Chain Optimization,
Geodis Global Solutions

Panelist

Brian Reed

CEO,
Tucker Company Worldwide

Panelist

Jeff Tucker

Technology I:
Building Blockchain, One Link at a Time

Location: Room 104B, 1st Floor

Over the past year, there’s hardly been a bigger buzzword in the transportation and logistics space than blockchain. The concept — a decentralized ledger that provides an irrefutable record of events and data — is undoubtedly appealing, but a few issues have hindered adoption of the technology. For one, most people in the liner shipping industry spent much of 2018 simply trying to understand what the technology was, and how it was relevant to their businesses. Second, there are questions about whether the benefits of blockchain outweigh the cost to invest or join an existing platform. Third, there are issues of trust around who is administering the systems. Within this context, 2018 saw progress on a number of fronts, both in terms of enterprise commercial platforms emerging — notably those led by Maersk and IBM; CargoSmart and the Ocean Alliance carriers; and APL, Accenture, AB InBev, and Kuehne + Nagel — and solutions developed by blockchain startups. This whirlwind of activity hasn’t eliminated the confusion about the intrinsic value of blockchain in global supply chains, nor has it cleared up the murkier issue of whether data standards are required to support adoption of blockchain solutions. This session will examine some of the thornier questions around blockchain in a logistics context, including whether the industry will gravitate toward platforms led by single liner carriers (or even a broader consortium of carriers), whether data standards need to be set to enable blockchain to take root, and whether so-called public blockchains (where parties don’t require permission to participate) are relevant in a logistics setting.

Sponsored by:

Monica Truelsch

Session Introduction

Director,
Solutions Strategy,
Infor

Peter Tirschwell

Session Chair

Executive Director Content,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Rob Bailey

Panelist

Co-Founder and CEO,
MState

Lionel Louie

Panelist

Chief Commercial Officer, CargoSmart

Andrew McLoone

Panelist

Director, Operations,
BDP International

Michael White

Panelist

CEO,
Maersk GTD Inc.

4:30 — 5:30 PM

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

Negotiating Contracts III, Technology II:
The Changing Dynamics of Ocean Freight Pricing

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

The hotel, airline, and live event industries have been transformed by their ability to instantly quote prices to consumers, and to dynamically flex prices as supply and demand changes. They also share a common trait: They sell perishable assets. Technology providers look at the ocean freight industry and see major parallels. What has prevented carriers and major freight forwarders from offering shippers the tools to instantly find a quote and book a guaranteed space on a vessel? The potential benefits to carriers of investing in online dynamic pricing are multiple: an ability to tap into customer segments that have eluded them, notably smaller and e-commerce-only shippers; an ability to dynamically extract premium pricing in environments where space is tight; and an ability to reduce the cost of sales associated with multiple customer segments, which might in turn allow them to price more competitively while maintaining a satisfactory margin. For smaller shippers, online pricing and booking could allow companies that have had to use intermediaries to establish direct connections to carriers. For larger shippers, the cost associated with turning to the spot market could be mitigated, while price discovery efforts could be augmented. And large shippers often struggle with burdensome procurement processes that tie up resources without an offsetting value at the end of negotiations. But there are headwinds to growth in this area: Large BCOs are reticent to sacrifice the leverage they enjoy in direct relationships with carriers; complex agreements with carriers over dozens of global lanes, with multiple surcharges and fees, are hard to reflect in an online environment; and carriers fear they might lose the personal connection with their largest customers in an online-only setting. This panel will explore how prepared the container shipping industry is for an instant quoting and booking environment, the extent to which carriers and large forwarders already have invested in these tools, and whether dynamic pricing will become a sizable part of the industry’s buying behavior in the future.

Sponsored by:

John Golob

Session Introduction

Chief Marketing Officer,
Winmore

Eric Johnson

Session Chair

Senior Editor, Technology,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Patrik Berglund

Panelist

CEO & Co-Founder,
Xeneta

Biju Kewalram

Panelist

Chief Digital Officer,
Agility

Zvi Schreiber

Panelist

CEO,
Freightos

Carl Varner

Panelist

Vice President,
Logistics,
Fornazor International

What Asia's Manufacturing Shift Means for
Trans-Pacific Supply Chains

Location: Room 102, 1st Floor

The US-China trade war and the possibility of more tension to come despite the early December truce has ratcheted up the urgency of where to source at retail, consumer product, and other companies. It's not a new challenge: The history of low-cost manufacturing has been a history of Asian economic development. In the 1970s, a resurgent Japanese economy dominated the manufacturing world, then production moved to the four “Asian Tigers” of Taiwan, Hong Kong, South Korea, and Singapore before being comprehensively taken over in the 1990s by China. In 2018, tariffs become a new element thrown into the mix. US tariffs imposed on Chinese-made products and Beijing’s retaliatory tariffs on goods imported from the US have accelerated a manufacturing shift out of China that has been underway for several years as the cost of labor and complying with environmental regulations increased. The good news for container shipping is that the production is largely remaining in Asia, with countries such as Vietnam, India, and Indonesia the beneficiaries. Vietnam’s exports to the US grew by 9 percent in the first three quarters of 2018 to 855,886 TEU, Indian exports to the US rose by 13.4 percent to 548,954 TEU, and Indonesia’s US exports rose 1.8 percent to 280,710 TEU, according to JOC parent company IHS Markit. But the shift in sourcing from China to factories in South and Southeast Asia comes with additional complexities for US importers. The countries have poor road and port infrastructure, the lead times are less reliable, transit times are longer, vessels call with less frequency, there is a greater need for transshipment, plus a general increased workload for procurement teams that must tame new vendors and drive best practices. This session will examine the impact of shifting manufacturing on shipper sourcing strategies in Asia, what costs are being added to their supply chains and how to manage those costs, and whether container shipping is adapting to the shifting trade flows.

Senior Editor,
Global Ports JOC,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Turloch Mooney

Global Supply Chain Director,
Procon Pacific LLC

Panelist

Daniel Krassenstein

Head of Ocean Freight,
Americas,
DHL Global Forwarding

Panelist

Andreas Krueger

Director and
Head of Market Intelligence,
Inside Fashion

Panelist

Jane Singer

Trucking II, Technology III:
Innovations in Trucking Technology

Location: Room 103, 1st Floor

The nitty-gritty, diesel-soaked world of trucking is being transformed by technology. From port terminals to a BCO’s inland distribution center to the final mile, digitization and automation is helping shippers find efficiencies that link them to capacity and better manage the flow of goods in their demand chains. While autonomous trucks is fueling speculation, the automation of processes is sparking innovation. What role will artificial intelligence and the Internet of Things play? This panel of innovators will examine how the latest technologies will improve the way trucking companies, BCOs, and shippers utilize technology to deliver on their own delivery promises to customers.

Sponsored by:

Mark Gamble

Session Introduction

Vice President of
Product Marketing,
Winmore

William Cassidy

Session Chair

Senior Editor,
Trucking,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Jonah McIntire

Panelist

Co-Founder and
Managing Director,
TNX Logistics

Anshu Prasad

Panelist

Founder and CEO,
LogisticsExchange

Santosh Sankar

Panelist

Co-Founder and Director,
Dynamo Venture Capital

Lidia Yan

Panelist

Co-Founder and CEO,
NEXT Trucking

Air Cargo Market Outlook:
Is Relief in Sight for Shippers?

Location: Room 104B, 1st Floor

Traditional air cargo shipments, both scheduled and unplanned emergency shipments that comprise almost half the global business, is competing for space with the huge and expanding cross-border e-commerce market. China alone accounts for 34 percent of global parcel volume. Its rising middle class wants high-quality and international products, and this is creating an explosion of e-retailers, logistics providers, and delivery brokers. According to McKinsey & Co., the market value for China's cross-border e-commerce is expected to increase from 1.0 trillion yuan ($145 billion) to 8.8 trillion yuan ($1.2 trillion) in the three years through 2018. Cross-border parcel deliveries also are expected to soar 60 percent, from 557 million shipments to 928 million. This demand for online products is keeping airline load-masters busy year-round and placing space on key trans-Pacific routes under even greater pressure at peak periods. Complicating shipper forecasting is the uncertainty of tariffs that affect demand patterns and create capacity shortages outside of the traditional seasons, and chronic ocean capacity constraints on the trans-Pacific trade in the last few months of 2017 that forced shippers into air freight, adding huge costs to their transportation bills. So what can shippers expect from the air cargo industry in the year ahead? Will the existing freighter fleet and the rapid growth in belly cargo capacity be enough to meet their space needs at peak periods, or will shippers be forced to hire expensive charterers? This session will examine the market and discuss how better planning can reduce the overall need for air cargo, and also ensure that space on aircraft is available when urgently required.

Sponsored by:

Senior Vice President,
Sales and Marketing,
Apex Logistics

Session Introduction

Michael Piza

Senior Editor, Europe,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Greg Knowler

Vice President,
Cargo Sales,
United Airlines

Panelist

James Bellinder

Vice President,
Global Supply Chain and Logistics,
Claire's Stores

Panelist

David Torma

President,
Tigers (USA) Global Logistics

Panelist

Sebastian Tschackert

Air Cargo Derivatives Broker,
Freight Investor Services

Panelist

Peter Stallion

5:30 — 7:30 PM

Welcome Reception

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Beacon Ballroom

Sponsored by:

STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY: All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.